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Full text of "Echo"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/echo1946smit 



Foreword 

SMITH ACADEMY 

The rambling structure, the red-brick wall, 

The ivy climbing over all. 
The fiat green lawn, the familiar old walk 

And on the side lawn, that old gray rock. 
Familiar landmarks on each golden day 

That we'll think of fondly when we're far away. 

Hallways overflowing with girls and boys, 

Sharing together all of life's joys. 
The books we've studied night after night, 

Trying to make tomorrow's lesson right. 
The teachers' voices as they patiently explain 

And clear up any doubts that still remain. 

All these things, so precious and dear, 

Little memories from year to year, 
Engraved forever in our hearts, 

Remain part of school life, now that new life starts. 

EVELYN SZEWCZYK '46. 




JHaru Btsabeth Drake 



TO MARY DRAKE A FRIEND 

The finest thing in all the world 

Is not the sun's warm light. 
Tis not the day's soft splendor, 

Nor the witchery of night: 
Tis neither wealth nor fame, 

Nor the glamour these can lend. 
Tis but the joy of having 

An understanding friend. 



Mary, we dedicate this Year Book to you, a loyal and well-loved classmate, as a 
sincere tribute to your winning personality, your fine sense of humor and your unfaih 
ing cheerfulness. Your strong courage and firm determination have won our lasting 
admiration and have been for all of us a source of inspiration during our high school 
course. May the future bring to you the happiness and contentment we all wish 
for you. 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Issued by the Students of Smith Academy 
Hatfield, Massachusetts 



Vol. VI June, 1946 

CONTENTS 

Foreword 1 

Dedication 2 

Faculty 4 

Year Book Staff 5 

Senior Pictures 6-10 

Class History 11 

Graduation Program 13 

Class Night Program 14 

Class Day Program 14-26 

Seniorscope 27 

Cheerleaders 28 

They'll Never Forget 28 

Class Song and Poem 29 

Student Council 30 

School Paper Staff 31 

Junior Class 32 

Sophomore Class 33 

Freshman Class 34 

Honor Essays 35-38 

Basketball Team 39 

Soccer Team 40 

Literary 41-43 

Thespians 44 

Pro Merito 45 

Washington Trip 46-47 

Informal Snaps 49 

School Autographs 50 

Autographs 51 

Advertisements 52 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



The Faculty 




Mrs. Muller, Miss Connelly, Mr. Bart, Mrs. Pruzynski, Mr. Larkin, Miss Ryan, Mrs. 
O'Neill, Mr. Symanczyk. 



* * * 



CLARENCE J. LARKIN, A.B., Principal 

Algebra, Geometry 



JOSEPH BART, B. S. 



Amherst College 
Mass. State College 



Agriculture Instructor 



MARGARET L. CONNELLY Worcester Domestic Science School 

Household Arts Instructor 

JOHN SYMANCZYK, B.S., B.A. New York University, A. I. C. 

Biology, Science, U. S. History, Problems of Democracy, Physics 

MRS. F. E. MULLER, A.B. Wheaton College 

Latin, French, World History 

MRS. B. C. O'NEILL Bay Path Institute, Commercial College 

New York University 
Shorthand, Commercial, English 1-2. Business Training 

MRS. MARGARET B. PRUZYNSKI McCarthy's Business College 

Shorthand, Typing, Business Arithmetic 



MARY E. RYAN, A. B. 

Classical English, Commercial English 3-4 



Smith College 



SMITH ACADEMY 



Year Book Staff 




First Row: Lawrence Stoddard, Annette Kempisty, Joanne Howard, Jennie Maiewski, 
Marie Korza, Joan Bangs, Margaret Vachula, Evelyn Szekczyk, Shirley Labbee, 
William Mullins. 

Second Row: John Fortch, Shirley Eberlein, Bernice Buchowski, James McGrath, Mrs. 
Pruzynski, Mr. Larkin, Miss Ryan, Caroline Kosior, Stanley Kirejczyk. 



Co-Editors Joan Bangs, Marie Korza 

Associate Editors Jennie Maiewski, Margaret Vachula 

Literary Editors Evelyn Szewczyk, Annette Kempisty, Evelyn Kacinski 

Sports Editors , Stanley Kirejczyk, Shirley Eberlein 

Business Manager William Mullins 

Assistant Business Managers Laurence Stoddard, Bernard Sawacki 

Photographic Editors Carolyn Kosior, Joanne Howard 

Faculty Advisers Miss Ryan, Mrs. Pruzynski, Mr. Larkin 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 





JOAN BANGS "Bangsy" 

Bradstreet. Classical: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2 ,3, 4. 
Pro Merito 3, 4. President of Pro Merito 4. Delegate to 
State Pro Merito Convention. Class Treasurer 2. Student 
Council 1, 3. Thespians 4. Senior Play 4. Softball 2. Assist- 
ant Mgr. of Basketball Team 3. Prize Speaking 3. Year- 
book staff 3. 4. School paper staff 3, 4. Washington trip 4. 
Valedictorian . . . fun loving . . . Burgy sailors . . . square 
dances . . . Mass. State . . . lemon and lime. 



SHIRLEY BETSOLD "Pee Wee" 

West Hatfield. Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 
1, 2. 3, 4. School paper 3, 4. Softball team 2. Thespians 4. 
Senior Play 4. Washington trip 4. 

Slight . . . spaghetti lover . . . Beechwood dances . . . Vic- 
tory Orchestra secretary . . . Easthampton and men! 





JOSEPH BLYDA "Joe" 

Hatfield. Classical: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Soccer 1, 3, 4. Basketball 2, 4. Prize speaking winner, 3. 
Yearbook 3. Student Council 3, 4. President of Student 
Council 4. Delegate to Student Council State Convention. 
Washington trip 4. 

Polish dances . . . Velma . . . known by his Chevvie . . . 
shy ???... easily flattered. 




JENNIE CACKOWSKI 

Bradstreet. Commercial: Glee Club 1. 

3, 4. Washington trip 4. 

Tiny . . . weakness, Iggy . . . Redmen's . . 

minded . . . frequent telephone calls . . . gay 



"Jen" 
3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 



marriage- 



SMITH ACADEMY 



SHIRLEY EBERLEIN "Wick" 

Hatfield. Classical: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Prize speaking 3. School paper staff 4. Yearbook staff 4. 
Girls' basketball 1, 2. Girls' Basketball Mgr. 4. Washing- 
ton trip 4. 

Short . . . roller skating . . . tall men . . . vaudevilles . . . 
deep sea diving . . . joke teller. 




BERNARD KACENSKI "Bronka" 

Hatfield. Vocational: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 2, 3, 4. Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4. Prize 
speaking 3. Student Council 4. Class President 3. 
Tall and dashing . . . allergic to girls . . . daring . . . memo- 
ries of Aggie trip to Vermont . . . well dressed . . . sports 
lover. 




MARIE KORZA "Emma" 

West Hatfield. Classical: Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. School paper staff 3, 4. Yearbook 
3, 4. Prize speaking 3. Pro Merito 3, 4. Secretary of Pro 
Merito 4. Delegate to Pro Merito Convention 4. Washington 
trip 4. Class secretary 3, 4. Class president 3. Softball 2. 
Salutatorian . . . unable to make decisions . . . likes 
Fords . . . always laughing . . . popular girl . . . mysterious. 



NELLIE KORZA "Nel" 

West Hatfield. General: Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 
4. Softball 2. Stage properties 3, 4. Washington trip 4. 
School paper 4. 

Cheery disposition . . . never misbehaves . . . always will- 
ing to help . . . New Hampshire . . . loves being a twin. 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




CAROLYN KOSIOR "Carry" 

Hatfield. Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Yearbook 4. Senior Play 4. Dramatic Club 4. Cheer leader 
4. Washington trip 4. 

Quite a friendly little girl . . . si ly spells . . . chocolate 
chip ice cream . . . Jimmy . . . takes frequent trips to 
Baltimore . . . horse races. 




WILLIAM MULLINS "Bill" 

Hatfield. Classical: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Basketball 3, 4. Class treasurer 3. School paper 3, 4. Year- 
book 3, 4. Thespians 4. Prize speaking 3. Washington trip 4. 
Our only 6-footer . . . practical joker . . . just beginning 
to realize that girls are interesting . . . Washington class 
trip ... is she from South Deerfield ? 



SHIRLEY LABBEE "Pickles" 

Hatfield. Commercial: Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
School paper 3, 4. Yearbook 3, 4. Basketball 2, 3. Senior 
Play 3, 4. Thespians 3, 4. Cheer leader 3, 4. Prize speaking 
3. Washington trip 4. 

That certain Marine in China . . . cheer leader . . . always 
smiling . . . moonlight nights . . . keen interest in South 
Deerfield and their athletes . . . prominent in dramatics. 



VELMA OMASTA "Vel" 

North Hatfield. Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 
1, 2, 3, 4. Class treasurer 1, 4. Class secretary 2. Basket- 
ball 3, 4. Representative to Student Council State Con- 
vention 4. School paper 2, 3, 4. Cheer leader 3. 4. Thespians 
4. Secretary of Student Council 4. Senior play 4. 
Dark . . . peppy . . . carefree . . . one of Mr .Larkin's 
competent secretaries . . . typing whizz . . . lover of sports. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



ROBERT PELC "Bob" 

Hatfield. Vocational: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Prize speaking 3. Student Council 4. 

Loved by freshman girls . . . horse races . . . drives a big 
car . . . nothing bothers him . . . doesn't know what schools 
are for . . . cute. 




LAURENCE STODDARD "Larry" 

West Hatfield. Classical: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 
3, 4. Baseball 2. Class vice-president 3. School paper 3, 4. 
Yearbook 3, 4. Class president 4. Prize speaking 3. Stu- 
dent Council 4. Sergeant-at-arms 4. Thespians 4. Wash- 
ington trip 4. Delegate to Student Council State Con- 
vention 4. 

He and Bill, inseparable . . . bought "her" a beautiful 
bracelet . . . well dressed . . . class president . . . visits 
5 & 10 quite often. 



EVELYN SZEWCZYK "Ev" 

Bradstreet. Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 
3, 4. Pro Merito 3, 4. Delegate to State Pro Merito Con- 
vention 4. Student Council 2. Thespians 4. Senior play 4. 
Softball 2. Prize speaking 2. Yearbook staff 3, 4. School 
paper staff 1, 3, 4. Washington trip 4. 

Personality gal ... to know her is to like her . . . sensible 
. . . third honors . . . men don't interest her (much) . . . 
lover of candy bars. 



BARBARA TOBACCO "Bee" 

Hatfield. General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Glamour girls . . . loves Navy men (who doesn't) . . . 
happy-go-lucky . . . beeautiful hair . . . not a care in the 
world. 



10 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




PAULINE WIDELO "Pauly" 

Hatfield. General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Manager of Girls' Basketball Team 4. Stage properties 2, 
3, 4. Vice-president of camera club 1. 

Takes her time . . . easily disturbed . . . White Eagles . . . 
Vets, her main interest . . . undecided future . . . hamburgs. 



VICTORIA ZAWACKI "Vicky" 

Hatfield. General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Vice-president of class 1. Smith Academy Choristers 3. 
Girls' basketball 2, 3. Vice-president of Happy-Go-Lucky 
Club 1. Stage properties 2, 3, 4. 

Likes crowds and dancing . . . tall and attractive . . . the 
silent type (OH YEAH!) . . . explosive giggle . . . friendly. 



Ex-Seniors 



Virginia Carl 
Champ Dickinson 
Mary Drake 
Marie Goller 
Alfred Holhut 
John Kozash, Jr. 
Edward Kraulis 
Charles Kuzonkoski 
Lester Kuzonkoski 



Phyllis LaMontagne 
Edward Lapinksi 
Edward Majeski 
William Pashek 
Stanley Pinkoski 
Stella Sadowski 
Joseph Sadylowski 
Mary Sheehan 
Dolores Vollinger 
Ruth Zuroff 



SMITH ACADEMY 



11 



Class History 



Friends and Classmates: 



We are going to take you on a voyage 
with us; not an unusual voyage, but one 
which is taken in the course of almost 
everyone's life. We shall turn our calendars 
back to the year of 1942, when our great 
journey started. In that year we started on 
our way, twenty-eight Smith Academy 
freshmen, with Mr. Bristol and Mrs. Fuller 
as our faculty advisors. Our class officers 
were as follows:: President, Edward La- 
pinski; vice-president, Victoria Zawacki; 
secretary, Marie Goeller, and treasurer, 
Velma Omasta. The member of our class 
to be chosen for the Student Council was 
Joan Bangs. 

As we journeyed along into our sopho- 
more year, we had twenty-two traveling 
along with us. At the head of this some- 
what smaller group were, president, Marie 
Korza; vice-president, Carolyn Kosior; sec- 
retary, Velma Omasta, and treasurer, Joan 
Bangs, with Mr. Larkin and Miss Connelly 
as our class advisors. Evelyn Szewczyk was 
the member of our class to be chosen to 
the Student Council. We sponsored a Hal- 
lowe'en party which was declared a success 
by all. At this social event the traditional 
Hallowe'en stunts and games were enjoyed 
by all and a special feature was a fortune 
teller, Madame Zambini, impersonated by 
Gertrude Zimbiski. Refreshments of cider 
and doughnuts were served and the V. and 
T. orchestra played for dancing. One of our 
class members, Edward Lapinski, was also 
included in the cast of the senior play en- 
titled, "Huckleberry Finn," in which he 
cleverly enacted the part of Tom, one of 
Huck's chums. Members of our class to 
take part in the annual prize speaking con- 
test that year were Evelyn Szewczyk and 
Edward Lapinski, who both won second 
prize. 

In September, when we began the third 
lap of this long ,hard, adventurous journey, 
only nineteen students were at hand to con- 
tinue to the end. At the head of this group 
we found as our president, Bernard Kacin- 
ski; vice-president, Laurence Stoddard; sec- 
retary, Marie Korza, and treasurer, William 



Mullins. Our class advisors were Mr. Jako- 
bek and Mrs. O'Neill. Cur first class activity 
was sponsorship of the annual freshman 
reception, which was held in October. The 
committees were organized with the fol- 
lowing people serving on them: Carolyn 
Kosior, Velma Omasta, Evelyn Szewczyk, 
Shirley Labbee, Shirley Eberlein, Shirley 
Betsold, Laurence Stoddard, Barbara To- 
bacco, Joan Bangs, Pauline Widelo, Robert 
Pelc, and William Mullins, generally super- 
vised by Mrs. O'Neill and Mr. Jakobek. We 
found the freshmen very cooperative and 
their willingness to carry out any stunt 
suggested added to the enjoyment of the 
evening. Music was furnished by the V. and 
T. orchestra. Members of our class who took 
part in the prize speaking contest were: 
William Mullins, Joseph Blyda, Shirley Lab- 
bee, Joan Bangs, Robert Pelc, Marie Korza, 
Laurence Stoddard and Shirley Eberlein. 
First prize was awarded to Joseph Blyda 
with Laurence Stoddard and Shirley Labbee 
both taking seconds. Members of the Stu- 
dent Council Were Joan Bangs and Joseph 
Blyda. Marie Korza, Joan Bangs and Eve- 
lyn Szewczyk proved to be our brightest 
members for they were named to Pro 
Merito membership for excellence in 
scholarship. We were fortunate to have two 
members of our class chosen to be cheer 
leaders, Shirley Labbee and Velma Omasta. 
The boys of our class participated in all 
sports. Joseph Blyda, Bernard Kacinski 
and Robert Pelc played soccer with Kacin- 
ski, Pelc and William Mullins participating 
in basketball. Shirley Labbee made her de- 
but as a thespian this year, as she was 
chosen for a leading part in the cast of 
the senior play, "Almost Eighteen." 

The final year of our journey found the 
nineteen faithful travelers headed for the 
final goal — graduation. Our class officers 
were: President Laurence Stoddard; vice- 
president, Robert Pelc; secretary, Marie 
Korza, and treasurer, Velma Omasta. Class 
advisors were Miss Ryan and Mrs. Prus- 
zyski. No other members managed to be 
eligible for the scholarship honor of Pro 
Merito so Joan Bangs, Marie Korza and 



12 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Evelyn Szewczyk were our three best stu- 
dents. Members of our Student Council 
were Velma Omasta, Joseph Blyda, Laur- 
ence Stoddard, Robert Pelc and Bernard 
Kacinski. We now had three cheer leaders 
from our class: Carolyn Kosior, Velma 
Omasta and Shirley Labbee. On the basket- 
ball team were four seniors: Bernard Ka- 
cinski and Robert Pelc, who acted as co- 
captains; William Mullins and Joseph 
Blyda. John Foster, a sophomore, com- 
pleted the team. 

The senior play this year was the comedy, 
"Pickles Becames a Lady." Members of our 
class in the cast were: Shirley Labbee, 
Robert Pelc, Evelyn Szewczyk, Carolyn 
Kosior, Joan Bangs, Velma Omasta and 
Shirley Betsold. The play was a smashing 



success, with a repeat performance. Two 
dances were also sponsored during this 
year. Ray Black furnished the music at the 
first one, in November; Corky Calkins pro- 
vided the music for the second one, in Feb- 
ruary. 

In April thirteen students from our class 
went on the Washington (D. C.) trip, 
which proved memorable to all. 

Our honor students, announced in May, 
were: Valedictorian, Joan Bangs; saluta- 
torian, Marie Korza, and third honor stu- 
dent, Evelyn Szewczyk. We dropped anchor 
after our four-year journey on June 20, 
1946, when we received diplomas and set 
forth equipped for new and longer travels. 

CAROLYN KOSIOR '46. 
NELLIE KORZA '46. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



13 



Graduation Program 

Thursday, June 20, 1946 



1. PROCESSIONAL 

2. THE NATIONAL ANTHEM 

3. A DISCIPLINED DEMOCRACY 

MARIE .T KORZA 

4. FREEDOM— THE MOST CHERISHED GIFT 

EVELYN E. SZEWCZYK 

5. THE WORLD VIEW 

JOANM. BANGS 

6. MUSIC— Morning Invitation 

SCHOOL CHORUS 
"Lullaby" 

GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 



Veazie 
Brahms 



7. ANNOUNCEMENT OF AWARDS 

PRINCIPAL CLARENCE J. LARKIN 

8. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

WILLIAM H. DICKINSON 
President of Smith Academy Board of Trustees 

9. SCHOOL SONG 



10. RECESSIONAL 



14 PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Class Day Program 

Wednesday, June 19, 1946 



THE NATIONAL ANTHEM 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME 

LAURENCE STODDARD 

CLASS STATISTICS 

SHIRLEY EBERLEIN, VELMA OMASTA, PAULINE WIDELO 

CLASS PROPHECY 

SHIRLEY BETSOLD, CAROLYN KOSIOR, SHIRLEY LABBEE 

CLASS WILL 

NELLIE KORZA, ROBERT PELC, VICKY ZAWACKI 

SELECTION 

"The Swallows" Coiven 

GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

CLASS GIFTS 

JOSEPH BLYDA, JENNIE CACKOWSKI. BARBARA TOBACCO 

ADDRESS TO UNDERGRADUATES 

WILLIAM MULLINS 

PRESENTATION OF GIFT TO SCHOOL 
BERNARD KACENSKI 

ACCEPTANCE OF GIFT 

STANLEY KIREJCZYK 

CLASS SONG 

''Commencement Day" Churchill & Grindell 

SENIOR CLASS 

SCHOOL SONG 



SMITH ACADEMY 



15 



Address of Welcome 



Parents, teachers, friends and school- 
mates — it gives me great pride and pleas- 
ure to extend to you a most hearty wel- 
come to our class day activities. 

Tomorrow is the long awaited day when 
we, the class of 1946, graduate. At this 
time we have come to the end of our studies 
and the beginning of our journey through 
life. Many of us will continue through 
higher schools, some of us will enter im- 
mediately on the business of earning a liv- 
ing. We all feel confident that the training 
we have received here will enable us to 
choose with some wisdom our destination. 
Now that peace one more prevails in the 
world, we are once again facing a period 
of changing times. Although we completed 
our high school course during three years 
of war we feel that with the training we 
have received here we will be better able 



to meet the emergencies that may arise. We 
realize that through the patience and en- 
couragement of our parents we have been 
able to complete the required high school 
course despite the temptations to leave 
school and become a part of the war's 
great industrial machine. We also wish to 
express our sincere gratitude to the faculty 
who helped us through many trying times 
during our past four years at Smith Acad- 
emy. The thoughts and memories of our 
good times here together will never be for- 
gotten, and the training we have received 
here we hope to use well. 

It is a pleasure to have you all gathered 
here with us this evening for our class day 
exercises. Once again, in behalf of my class, 
I bid you all a most hearty welcome. 

LAURENCE STODDARD. 



Class Statistics 



Babs, the blonde glamour gal of our class, 
To bookkeeping period she always came last. 
As one of our prize speakers she did her part, 
And for the future she has made a great start. 
For that flirtatious look and "Pepsodent" smile, 
Any Casanova would walk a mile. — Barbara Tobacco. 

We really don't know what to say about Shirley, 
But we all know she loves to be called "little girlie." 
As an actress she appeared in the senior class play, 
And won much applause for her very studious way. 
Full of hustle and bustle, she goes from class to class, 
A girl full of pep and energy is this West Hatfield lass. 

— Shirlev Betsold. 



Velma Omasta, our class treasurer, is a cheer leader by trade; 

As Captain of the Girls' Basketball team, a speedy forward she made. 

She can do shorthand extremely well, 

And we know that in this art Velma will always excel. 

At night you will see her waiting around 

For a black "Chevie" from North Street — to come down . 



16 PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 

On the basketball floor Bernie can't be beat. 

And he has looks and personality, our great athlete. 

When you hear the freshmen girls all swoon, 

You will know its Bernie walking in the room. 

He was always prepared on oral day, 

And we were always anxious to hear what he had to say. 

— Bernard Kacinski. 

Joseph Blyda, our Student Council President, so loyal and true. 

When Joe has no date he surely is blue. 

As a basketball guard he was speedy and great, 

But when he came to school he was always late. 

He sure gets peeved when his brother takes the car, 

Because by foot he can't get very far. 

As president of our class he did excel; 

Those geometry problems he did very well. 

Was navigator for the Webster convention, 

Which proved to him that "Wiggles" wasn't a new invention. 

The colored fountains he'll never forget. 

Over Laurence Stoddard we'll never fret. 

As girls' basketball manager, she kept the books, 

And as a girl, she sure has looks. 

A petite senior girl so sweet 

Is Shirley Eberlein, she can't be beat. 

The Washington trip was interesting to her. 

Ask her about Dick and she'll begin to stir. 

If bookkeeping and dancing just don't mix, 

Ask Vicky, for she has all the tricks. 

A black-haired girl with eyes so brown; 

When seen with a sailor never has a frown. 

It's Vicky and Bob you see so happy, 

When Bob's not around she just goes wacky. — Vicky Zawicki. 

Our valedictorian so small 

Is Joan Bangs, she knows all. 

Her main topic is square dancing and Kicky; 

She thinks gobs are just too tricky. 

Her report card is filled with "A's." 

It's Joan Bangs you'll usually find in a daze. 

Now Jennie's the girl who sure likes Hadley. 

Could it be Iggie she loves so badly? 

In bookkeeping class she did well 

Her uproarious laugh sure does excel. 

Small, neat and full of pep 

Was Jennie Cackowski on the Washington trip. 



SMITH ACADEMY 17 

She wanted to get rid of her books in May, 

Because she couldn't wait until this day. 

Has anyone ever heard of Jimmy ? 

Ask Carolyn and she'll say "By Jimminy!" 

In Washington was where they met; 

It's Carolyn Kosior who's still in that "net." 

Our tallest senior, otherwise known as "Dream," 
For Agnes his eyes hold a certain gleam. 
In basketball he certainly raised the score; 
For Billy Mullins— can I say more. 

Our peppy salutatorian, known as Emma, 

By Bob is always kept in a dilemma. 

Her duties as co-editor-in-chief kept "her in a tizzy"; 

Her peppiness in basketball always made her quite dizzy. 

— Marie Korza. 

Lieutenant Hamilton he was known as in the play; 
His dark brown eyes hold the girls in their sway. 
In Aggie, and in every sport, he does excel, 
For Robert Pelc is one known as "swell." 

From Shirley Labbee, this I quote, 

"On sailors, letters and dancing I dote." 

For two years as cheer leader she did her bit; 

As "Pickles" in the school play she scored a hit. 

Our third student, by name of Evelyn, 

For boys it seems she doesn't care a fin. 

In the play as "Miss Dibble" she did very well, 

Her typing and bookkeeping is done extra well. 

Pauline, our only senior from Valley Street, 

Thinks square dancing and sailors are quite "all reet." 

As assistant manager of the Girls' Basketball Team, 

The players still hold her in their highest esteem. 

She also has interest in a handsome senior. 

How could she ever forget those trips to the Valley Arena? 

— Pauline Widelo. 

Her laugh follows her wherever she goes, 

For Nellie Korza is really on her toes. 

For Household Arts is her joy and pride 

And interior decorating falls into her stride. 

Her talk about New Hampshire is something killing; 

The nights in Washington she thought were thrilling. 

SHIRLEY EBERLEIN, 
VELMA OMASTA, 
PAULINE WIDELO. 



18 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Class Prophecy 



Ou relders have always told us to prophet 
by experience; so we shall now prophesize. 
Sitting here in our little tent, may we in- 
troduce ourselves? Madame Gypsy Zam- 
bini, Madame Lazonga and Madame Salome. 
And now, as we gaze into our little crystal 
ball, it is still cloudy. It begins to clear, 
and the year 1956 appears. 

With the year comes the name of Joan 
Bangs. We see that she is now a very suc- 
cessful chemist in the Stinko Blowout 
Chemical Plant in Dogpatch Country, Ken- 
tucky. With her is her husband, Eddie — 
who was a former sailor in '46. She mar- 
ried seven years ago, on her saddest day. 
But what are those little atoms we see? 
Those must be her three little chemicals, 
or children, as they were called back in 
1946. If you wish to know more about her 
chemical existence — that will be just one 
dollar more. 

Into the ball now appear two figures. One, 
a dark-haired, peppy woman, walks briskly 
along, followed by her slow-motioned, wan- 
looking husband. Of his eight years of 
happy marriage seven and one-half have 
been spent in the dog house. Evidently the 
housing shortage of 1946 has not let up. 
Mr. Blyda and Mrs. Blyda (the former Vel- 
raa Omasta, cheer leader of S. A. in '46) 
have now taken over the J. C. Ryan estate. 
Mr. and Mrs. Blyda are still quite promi- 
nent in their social activities and are mem- 
bers of the "Black Owl Club," formerly 
the White Eagle of Northampton. The ball 
is becoming clouded again. 

Out of the mist and into the clear — a 
church. Going up the aisle is a slight- 
looking woman of twenty-eight. As the 
vows begin, we hear the name of Jennie 
Cackowski. Was this the girl destined to 
be the first one married in the Class of '46 
at Smith Academy? Ten years, yes — ten 
long years it took Miss Cackowski to cross 
the small, deep river separating her from 
her beloved Ignatz and Hadley. During her 
ten years, Jennie attended the College of 
Hard Knocks at General Cigars. 

The scene changes. We are now at the 
Palladium in New York City. The featured 
attraction is Miss Shirley Eberlein and 



her Roller Skating Vanities of '56. While 
in high school we see in our crystal ball, 
Miss Eberlein at the Gables in South Deer- 
field, struggling, fighting, up again, down 
again, and never giving up. Her everlasting 
courage and patience finally rewarded her; 
to make her known all over the world as 
the Queen on Wheels. She is the only 
queen who ever sat down on the floor 
while on wheels. 

Flash! Around a curve in the crystal ball 
comes a dashing young motorcycle racer. 
His face is covered with dust and grime; we 
are unable to tell who he is. But by over- 
hearing remarks, we learn that this hand- 
some young man has been the champion 
cyclist of the world for five years. He now 
resides at Riverside Drive in Chicago and 
is the owner of several motorcycle plants 
all over the country. The young man sur- 
rounded by admiring women we see is Ber- 
nard Kacenski, former athlete of S. A. in 
'46. 

A switchboard is seen in the crystal ball. 
Behind this switchboard is a blonde-haired 
girl with a keen interest in her work. She 
is sitting there with a contented look on 
her face. This face we recognize as Miss 
Nellie Korza whose one ambition is now 
fulfilled. We see on Miss Korza's left hand 
a very beautiful diamond presented to her 
by John Jacob Jinky Jones, the president 
of the company. The wedding will be a 
June event, after which they will reside in 
Greenfield. 

Soft music and low lights feature the 
next picture in the crystal ball. The scene 
is the Stork Club in New York, where all 
celebrities are often seen. While we are 
sitting there a very familiar girl approaches 
our table. She stops at our table and her 
face lights up with recognition. We find 
that Miss Carlyn Kosior has been employed 
at the Stork Club ever since '46 as a host- 
ess. The featured orchestra is the McCor- 
mack Rhythm Boys, of Braintree, Mass. 
During the evening Miss Kosior's engage- 
ment is announced to the leader of the 
McCormack band, Mr. James McCormack. 
Mr. and Mrs. McCormack will make their 
home in Los Angeles, California, where the 



SMITH ACADEMY 



19 



former Miss Kosior will make her debut in 
the picture, "Victory Garden Romance." She 
will be starred as a "sad tomato" and the 
leading man as a "dead beet." 

A tunnel of love at Glen Echo Park in 
Washington, D. C, with two very passion- 
ate lovers appears in the crystal ball. Mr. 
and Mrs. William Mullins are on their 
honeymoon and decided to return to the 
place where they first met. Mrs. Mullins, or 
Agnes, as Bill calls her, is a native of South 
Deerfield. Mr. Mullins is to continue his 
farming career while Mrs. Mullins is to 
take a new teaching position at Smith 
Academy. They will reside on the banks of 
the beautiful Connecticut River in their new 
glass home. 

Now in the crystal ball we see a funeral 
parlor in Hartford, Connecticut. Of what 
interest could this possibly be to the former 
class of '46? At the receptionist's desk we 
see a young dark-haired woman whom we 
notice with surprise is the former Miss 
Shirley Labbee, now married to the owner 
of the funeral home, none other than Porter 
W. Pratt, former Marine corporal in '46. 
Mrs. Pratt is happily married, even though 
a corpse does interrupt most of the time. 
One day while walking down the street, 
Mr. Pratt was heard to remark to Mrs. 
Pratt, "Darling, if I ever look at another 
woman, I hope to fall from the face of this 
earth." Just then he fell into a manhole! 

The scene changes. We are now in a big 
newspaper plant in Helpum Village, in a 
little office above the door of which is writ- 
ten, "Problems of Love and Matrimony 
Answered by Evelyn Szewczyk." The place 
is literally cluttered with teen-ugers, old 
maids, bachelors, and hen-pecked husbands, 
all seeking Miss Szewczyk's advice. Miss 
Szewczyk gained some experience way back 
in S. A. in '46, listening to many of the 
girls' troubles and giving her personal ad- 
vice. Evelyn, who is a very worldly woman, 
has made a number of trips to Europe and 
plans to open a new office in Washington, 
D. C. We wish her success in this type of 
work. 

A terrific explosion rends the air; fear 
strikes our hearts as we think the world 
has come to an end; however, it is only 
Larry Stoddard, trying to outdo his com- 



petitors in the field of invention. He has 
invented a new jet-propulsion machine 
which propels him to his home and his wife, 
Mrs. Dorothy Stoddard in West Farms. Mr. 
Stoddard's great ability in the chemistry 
class enabled him to pursue his career, 
which has paid him great dividends. 

By jet-propulsion Shirley Betsold now 
enters into the crystal ball. Miss Betsold is 
now a blues singer in the spacious Beech- 
wood Ballroom in South Hadley Falls, for 
Peter Tautznik and His Victory Recording 
Orchestra. After leaving high school in 1946 
we see much change in this slightly built 
woman; she did much for the morale of the 
Victory Orchestra with her deep, contralto 
voice. Exactly eleven months, twenty-six 
days and two and one-half hours after her 
graduation Miss Betsold was married to a 
certain ex-soldier from Northampton, and 
they reside at the newest swank hotel of 
Northampton, known as the Annapolis. Miss 
Betsold preferred this hotel as a memory 
of the trip to Annapolis, while in Wash- 
ington. Any time you would like to see 
Miss Betsold, just tune in WHYN and you 
can see her through television. What a 
sight for sore eyes. 

Out of the mist comes a sophisticated 
blonde model modeling a silver fox jacket. 
She is one of the famous Conover models 
whose professional name is Babs; to us she 
is the former classmate, Barbara Tobacco. 
Many classmates have bought their trou- 
seaus from Miss Tobacco's personal shop 
on Fifth Avenue, which she manages dur- 
ing her vacation from modeling for Con- 
over. While at Miss Tobacco's store we see 
Miss Pauline Widelo enter. What a coinci- 
dence to meet two former classmates in one 
day. Miss Widelo, who was a star book- 
keeper back in S. A., is now head of the 
bookkeeping department in Gimbel's De- 
partment Store, also on Fifth Avenue. Miss 
Widelo informed us that she has made up 
her mind to be the ideal career girl of 1956. 
When questioned about the man seen with 
her at one of the popular night spots, Miss 
Widelo remained quiet. She is not revealing 
her "love life," but oh, that light in her 
eyes. ... It certainly must be love — or is it 
the guy's money? 

Crowds dancing — a dark, stormy night, 



20 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



and a dark-haired girl in a flowing white 
gown is seen through the crystal ball. She 
is dancing with the now famous Gene Kel- 
ley of Hollywood, and who is it but — Miss 
Victoria Zawacki! The girl in the class of 
'46 who never missed a dance, Polish, 
square or otherwise. Vicky certainly has 
been rewarded for her dancing skill. She 
now owns her own school of dancing, spe- 
cializing in Polkas — where she guarantees 
to teach you to dance in six years, with 
lessons twelve hours a day, six days a 
week — or your money refunded. Anyone in- 
terested in taking lessons from Miss Za- 
wacki, please ask the crystal ball for her 
address. She is constantly on tour with Mr. 
Kelley, so it will be almost impossible to 
reach her unless you are lucky — and who 
isn't, when there's a crystal ball involved? 
Total darkness! The ball ceases to be 
clear, but then we see a row of hospital 
beds in a military hospital in Washington, 
D. C. The head nurse, a pretty dark-haired 
woman, approaches a bed where a hand- 
some Army Air Corps pilot sits up in bed. 
We see his face brighten, we see a light in 
the woman's eyes. This man must be 
Marie's fiancee, the man she met way back 
in '46 while on the Senior Class trip to 



Washington. It appears in our globe that 
his name is "Hutch," and he has been suf- 
fering from a very serious heart ailment 
which Marie has finally cared. After many 
of his proposals, Marie has consented to be 
his lawful wedded wife. She has revealed 
to us that she would like four little 
"Hutches." They will reside at 910 Glen 
Echo Parkway, Rumford, Maine. Mr. 
Hutchinson will be an instructor at his 
private airport and Marie will give up her 
nursing career to become a good wife and 
mother. 

In the crystal ball we see Knockum, 
Blockum and Sockum Stadium in Whodunit, 
Virginia. The star pitcher is none other 
than Speed Pelc, known all over the U. S. 
as the outstanding pitcher who has pitched 
no-hit games. While back in Smith Acad- 
emy Bob gained a lot of experience pitch- 
ing for the S. A. team. Mr. Pelc is the ideal 
bachelor of the Class of '46. Anyone wish- 
ing his address please notify the prophets. 
Yours, truly, yours truly and yours truly. 

SHIRLEY BETSOLD, 
CAROLYN KOSIOR, 
SHIRLEY LABBEE. 



Class Will 



We, being dignified members of the 
Senior Class, and of duly sound mind and 
body, in order that we may not be forgot- 
ten, do hereby give our last will and testa- 
ment as follows: 

JOE BLYDA . . . Leaves to Myron Sikor- 
ski an alarm clock so that Myron may get 
to school on time, a thing which Joe was 
seldom able to do. 

VELMA OMASTA . . . Our basketball star, 
leaves to her sister, Ethel, her uncanny 
technique in basketball and the honor of 
being Captain of the girls' basketball 
team. 

SHIRLEY EBERLEIN . . . Leaves to Janet 
Matusewicz her wonderful memories of 
all the square dances, in the hope that 
Janet will attend them as faithfully as 
Shirley has. 



SHIRLEY LABBEE . . . Leaves to Helen 
Szewczyk her many thoughts of South 
Deerfield and that certain athlete, so that 
Helen may enjoy her studies much more, 
as we are quite sure Shirley did. 

LAURENCE STODDARD . . . The hard- 
working boy of our class, leaves all his 
unfinished tasks and duties to James Mc- 
Grath to complete. 

MARIE KORZA . . . Leaves to Peggy Va- 

chula all the embarrassments — thrills, 
too, of being called out of class to answer 
those long distance telephone calls from 
across the Connecticut River. 

CAROLYN KOSIOR . . . Leaves to Stacia 
Kostek her many boy friends in New 
London, in the hope that Stacia may 
carry on as well as Carolyn did. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



21 



BARBARA TOBACCO . . . Leaves to Jen- 
nie Maiewski all her memories and good 
times at Redman's, the square dances, 
the parties, in hope that they will faith- 
fully be carried out by her beneficiary. 

VICKY ZAWACKI . . . Leaves to her sis- 
ter Lucy all her unfinished school work, 
so that Vicky can go dancing at Redman's 
or White Eagle's and have a swell time. 
For homework never stopped Vicky from 
going to the dances. 

NELLIE KORZA . . . Leaves to Irene 
Kraulis one of her many desires — to be 
able to travel to New Hampshire very, 
very often. We know Irene will enjoy 
these many trips as much as Nellie has. 

ROBERT PELC . . . Our version of a 
glamour boy, leaves to his brother, Carl, 
all his secrets of getting around with the 
girls and not having anyone know about 
it. 

EVELYN SZEWCZYK . . . Leaves her 
laughing spells, brilliant ideas and her 
winning personality to Jeanette Niewin- 
ski who, we know, will carry on the same 
as Evelyn did. 

SHIRLEY BETSOLD . . . Leaves to Dicky 
Labbee a wheelbarrow, so that he may 
carry his books to and from school with- 
out trouble. Although Shirley never did 
too much work all the books she carried 
home gave a good impression. 

PAULINE WIDELO . . . The glamour 
girl of our class, leaves to Helen Micha- 
lowski all her charm and personality so 
that Helen can attract all the boys at 
the square dances as Pauline did in the 
past. 

JOAN BANGS . . . Leaves to Joanne 
Howard her memories of the fun and 
good times while at the square dances — 
especially memories of the few friends 
from Burgy. 

JENNIE CACKOWSKI . . . Leaves to Lucy 
Szych a 1946 Ford coupe, so that she 
and her companion can make many en- 
joyable trips to Hadley and back instead 
of having to travel by bus. 



BERNIE KACINSKI ... The Casanova of 
our class, leaves to Sonny Proulx his 
ability to slide through the door just as 
the melodious echo of the gong is vibrat- 
ing through the corridors. 

WILLIAM MULLINS . . . The dream boy 
of our class, leaves to Dannie Fusek his 
Geormetry book of problems. Bill hopes 
Dannie will not be in a daze while in 
Geormetry class and will find Geometry 
not so confusing as he did. 

FOR MR. LARKIN . . . Our worthy prin- 
cipal, we have hired a secretary to do the 
office work. We hope this secretary will 
be even more efficient than the senior 
girls of the advanced typing class who 
have been here, trying to keep your office 
work up to date. 

TO MRS. PRUZYNSKI ... We leave a 
new electric Victrola which changes the 
records by itself so that Mrs. Pruzynski 
can sit comfortably in a soft easy chair 
and give the assignments to her students 
instead of having to jump up to change 
the record each time. 

TO MR. SYMANCZYK ... We leave a 
donkey and a go-cart so that the athletic 
supplies may be carried down to the 
athletic field without any over-exerting 
on the boys' part. 

TO MISS CONNELLY ... Our Home Eco- 
nomics teacher, we leave a large supply 
of equipment which includes: Needles, 
pins and cloth, so that Miss Connelly 
will not have to keep racing up to the 
Greenfield mill all the time for supplies, 
and we hope she will thus save wear and 
tear on her car. We also express to Miss 
Connelly, who is leaving Smith Academy, 
our sincere thanks for all the good work 
she did for S. A. while she was here. 
And our best wishes for a successful 
future. 

TO MISS RYAN . . . Our home-room 
teacher during the past year, we leave 
many memories of that terrible noisy 
Senior Class. We also leave our appre- 
ciation for enduring that noise, and the 
warning that if she thought we were bad, 
the new Senior Class has something in 
store for you. 



22 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



TO MR. BART ... We leave a supply of 
paper so that he may have enough to 
give to his Junior-Senior Aggie class, 
which he keeps very busy writing, writ- 
ing, and more writing. 

TO MRS. MULLER ... We leave a record- 
ing of her own voice saying, "People, will 
will you please settle down now!" to be 
used in her study periods. We are sure 
that this will save Mrs. Muller's time 
and energy. 

TO THE FRESHMEN ... We give nothing 
but advice: Don't study too hard or you'll 
have to use stove polish to cover those 
white streaks of hair. As you know, the 
brains are delicate; you may over-strain 
them and before you know it you will 
have a mental disorder. 

TO THE SOPHOMORES ... We leave 
this advice: Never hurry! Take it easy 
in S. A. as we did. Remember the old say- 
ing? "Haste makes waste." 

TO THE JUNIORS ... We bequeath our 
ability to pull the wool over the teachers' 
eyes. May the wool stay there all through 
your senior year, otherwise you will never 
make the grade. 



TO THE FACULTY AS A WHOLE . . . 
Lastly, but not leastly, we leave our 
dearly adored faculty our ability to take 
it on the chin and turn the other cheek, 
hoping that there is an especially nice 
heaven for the teachers, which will com- 
pensate them for all the agonies endured 
through these past four years. Now that 
we are graduating from these portals, 
dear teachers, may we forever bless you 
for getting rid of us as fast as you could. 

hundred and forty-six. 

TO THE BOOKKEEPING CLASS OF '47 
. . . The Bookkeeping class of '46 leaves to 
the new class a bottle of ink iradicator. 
If used correctly you will be able to get 
away with as much as we did. Warning: 
Don't get caught using this "magic poi- 
son" for better bookkeeping marks. It's 
dangerous ! 

In witness whereof, we have hereto sub- 
scribed our names and affix the seal of 
Smith Academy, this ninth day of June in 
the year of our Lord, one thousand nine 

Signed, 

ROBERT PELC, 
NELLIE KORZA, 
VICKY ZAWACKI. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



23 



Class Gifts 



Barbara Tobacco — We know that Barbara 
has a hard time sneaking out during the 
middle of the week so, we have — oh no — 
we can't give her a skeleton key as she 
already has managed to obtain one. In- 
stead, may we present to Barbara To- 
bacco, this tall blonde sailor. Of course 
he isn't the real McCoy, but he will do, 
won't he? You see Barbara just loves 
those men in coats of navy blue. 

Shirley Betsold — Look what I have for you, 
yes, a nice new 1946 Chevvie. Now you 
can go anywhere you wish, that is, of 
course, if you can make it go. As a result 
you'll be able to visit your aunt more 
often, but really Shirley, is it you're aunt 
you go to see? I wonder! 

Joan Bangs — Joan is what could be called 
a "chiseler." Though she has some of her 
own she would rather take some one 
else's. Do you ever borrow letter paper 
when you write to Kicky? I've found out 
that writing to him take up a lot of your 
time. I honestly tried to get some for 
you, but you know — money doesn't grow 
on trees so, I have for you this supply of 
composition paper. If you don't use it to 
write to that certain sailor you might 
use it to write notes. The kind of notes 
you wrote in Washington. Remember 
Room 505! 

Evelyn Szewczyk — Evelyn, who is that Don 
you met on the homeward ride from New 
York? What was it that he gave to you 
as a remembrance of him? Could it be 
French money? That's what I heard. It'll 
get tattered and torn if you carry it 
around very much longer. As a means of 
preservation I give you this scrapbook. 
It certainly is a scrap book but you'll 
have to forgive me as I just couldn't get 
a nice small one in the 5 & 10 cent store, 
so this is my best substitution. Do you 
think you'll be able to use it? 

Joseph Blyda — It seemed as though Joe had 
a hard time trying to get up to the fifth 
floor in the Hotel Plaza. Poor Joe. He 
was always caught in the act. Well, just 
in case you take another trip and forget 
what floor your room is on, I give to you 



this magic powder. It will make you in- 
visible to everyone but that certain dark- 
haired girl from North Hatfield. Take a 
powder, Joe. 

Robert Pelc — Tell me, Bob, will you ever 
forget that night you acted as a lieu- 
tenant at the play ? You certainly made 
all the girls' hearts jump. I tried to get 
some lieutenant bars for you, but that 
was impossible so — well, to remind you 
of the play, for valor on your part with 
the basketball team and for your tech- 
nique of charming girls, I give you this 
medal of honor. It's just a cheap thing, 
but its meaning is the same. 

Bill Mullins — Bill, our six-footer, has quite 
a time, it seems, maneuvering in and out 
of low places. No doubt when he takes 
out a certain girl from South Deerfield 
with the initials A. W., and called Agnes, 
he has quite a job bending over, so in 
order to prevent his back from aches and 
pains we have here a bottle of Sloan's 
liniment which is sure to aid his case. 

Victoria Zawacki — Vicky, who is constantly 
seen at the Polish dances, has quite a 
time finding transportation getting there, 
but when once she reaches her destination 
she has little trouble finding a way home. 
So in order to save her all the worrying 
about transportation to get to Redmen's 
and White Eagle's, we leave this bus 
pass which will take her anywhere, any 
time, one way. 

Caroline Kosior — To Caroline who, along 
with a few other girls, was caught play- 
ing Juliet to a bunch of sailors on the 
street in front of the hotel window in 
Washington, we leave this invisible ink, 
so that the next time the information 
gets into the wrong hands, the message 
will be unreadable. 

Velma (Jmasta — Clear the way! It seems 
Velma has just obtained her driver's li- 
cense. Although she has ridden through 
a few vegetable patches and streamlined 
the car a bit here and there, her case is 
pretty clear. So, in order to keep her on 
the safe side we bought her this new 



24 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



miracle car which is made of rubber and 
run by remote control. If she hits any- 
thing by chance it will bounce right back 
and shake the hit right off. 
Laurence Stoddard — What is this I hear? 
It seems that Larry has quite a job 
maneuvering about in order to get to his 
girl's house to take her out and he just 
can't ask her pop. So in order that he 
may get around more easily we have here 
this P-38 pursuit plane so that he can 
take off when the time comes to shove off. 
It is pretty tough hiking from West 
Farms. 

Shirley Labbee — You'd never guess what 
this object I'm holding in my hand is. It is 
a miniature microphone, commonly known 
as a "mike." To Shirley Labbee we are 
giving this because it seems that "mikes" 
have a particular attraction for her. 
Seems she just can't stay away from 
them. Just mention the word "Mike" to 
her and you'll have to settle down to 
listen to a thrilling tale featuring a cer- 
tain Mike from Washington. 

Pauline Widelo — Who is the gal with the 
most beautiful eyes in Smith Academy? 
Why Pauline Widelo, of course. To you, 
Pauline, we give this mascara so that you 
can make your eyes even more alluring. 
With this new enchantment we hope you 
can capture that certain someone. 



Jennie Cackowski — We give this wrist 
watch to Jennie Cackowski so that Jennie 
can return the one she's been wearing 
constantly to the "one and only" so that 
he can have the use of it. For, Jennie, 
he's got to know the time also, if you 
want him to be punctual on your dates! 

Bernard Kacinski — We hear that Bernard 
Kacinski, "the hero of our class," has his 
heart set on a motorcycle and expects to 
get one soon. As you haven't one as yet, 
Bernie, we give you this one so that you 
may get into practice. It has a buddy- 
seat so that you can take moonlight rides. 
Take it easy on the corners! 

Nellie and Marie Korza — Because Nellie 
and Marie are twins we'll have to give 
them something alike. So, twins, we 
though and thought; then we chose tele- 
phones for you, but for different pur- 
poses. We give one to Marie so that she 
may use it (privately) for those long- 
distance telephone calls to New Hamp- 
shire. We hear that twin sister Nellie 
wants to be a telephone operator, so we 
give her this one to practice with so that 
she may be right "on the ball" when she 
applies for the job. 

JOE BLYDA, 
BARBARA TOBACCO, 
JENNIE CACKOWSKI. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



25 



Address to Undergraduates 



It is indeed an honor and privilege to 
address you undergraduates in behalf of 
my class. During our high school course we 
have seen the world thrown into a disast- 
rous conflict and survive to start over 
again. We leave high school as the world 
is trying to arrange a just and lasting 
peace. The war itself brought about many 
rapid changes which will in some way or 
another affect our future and the future 
of you undergraduates who will follow us. 

During our four years we have learned 
that there are three important points to 
consider before starting any task. Because 
they are as important to you as they are to 
us, I shall enumerate them. First, you must 
determine your goal, then you must map 
out your route, and finally, you must take 
stock of necessary equipment in order to 
complete the task. 

Before you decide upon your goal, it is 
necessary to determine whether or not this 
is attainable to you. In choosing your route 
you must decide what course will be the 
smoothest, which will afford the most pleas- 
ant traveling, which will reach the ultimate 
destination most readily. Your immediate 
goal is the completion of your high school 
course. In order to reach that goal, you 
will have to select courses for which you 
have the most ability. You will have to 
equip yourselves with the desire to suc- 
ceed and With the determination to study 
hard, and you will have to learn to rely 
upon yourself. You will have to work hard, 
as did these pioneer ancestors of yours. 
You will not always have your parents and 
teachers to look after you, to carry your 
burdens, and to solve your problems. Un- 
less you decide not to have someone else 
sharing your burden, you will delay and 
reduce the rewards of education that are 
yours. 

Your studies thus far must have taught 
you that the road of life is difficult, and 
only the ones who are willing to encounter 
hardships and put energy and push into 



their work can ever hope for success in 
attaining their goal. Success is a difficult 
word to define. Perhaps some such defini- 
tions as this may serve the purpose: Suc- 
cess consists in making the most of one's 
opportunity. The person who makes the 
most of life makes the most of each pass- 
ing minute. You should not spend your 
days thinking of ways to kill timft. You 
must realize that if you kill time in your 
study periods, you will kill the opportunity 
to make good. 

Juniors — you have but one more year to 
complete your education. Remember that 
your high school life is the foundation for 
the structure of your future career as citi- 
zens of this community and the nation. 
Make next year a year to be proud of. 
Develop to the fullest the capacities you 
have already discovered, and prepare to 
leave high school equipped to take the next 
step forward with confidence. 

Sophomores — you must come to the un- 
derstanding now, before it is too late, that 
the manner in which you prepare your 
work is important, if you are to acquire an 
education. You have completed two years 
of high school. Now you know where you 
are going — set your course and make each 
moment count. 

Freshmen — you entered high school in a 
year that saw the end of terrible conflict 
of World War II. You will be able to follow 
the plans of reconversion and adapt your- 
selves to the changing world. Take subjects 
which will suit your needs in this changing 
world, and study well so that after you 
have completed your high school course you 
can take your place worthily in the new 
post-war era. Always hold in mind this 
saying: "The man who succeeds has a pro- 
gram; he lays his plans and executes them." 

To all of you the class of '46 extends 
wishes for success and hopes that you will 
profit from your course here and enjoy it 
as much as we have. 

WILLIAM J. MULLINS. 



_26 PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 

Presentation of Class Gift 

We are leaving high school at a time the flag of our state. We hope that this 

when education is more vitally needed than gift will serve as a token of our apprecia- 

ever before. The education we have received tion for aU we have received here . With it 

here is, we realize, a splendid foundation „ r „ „.„+„ i „;»,„„,. „„„,] „,;„t,„ * j.u -p,, 

' ' r we extend sincere good wishes for the fu- 



ture success of SMITH ACADEMY. 



for the discipline and knowledge that the 
future years are going to demand from us. 
In grateful appreciation we leave this gift, BERNARD KACINSKI. 



Senior Auto 

Headlights Joan Bangs, Marie Korza Extra Bright 

Rear Light Bob Pelc Always Out 

Wheels Carolyn Kosior, Shirley Eberlein Lively People 

Shirley Labbee, Velma Omasta 

Horn Bernie Kacinski Always blowing 

Gas Shirley Betsold Easily Burned Up 

Spare Tire Larry Stoddard Handy to have around 

Roof Bill Mullins Way over our heads 

Engine Joe Blyda Always knocking 

Free wheeling Evelyn Szewczyk Easy going 

Seat Nellie Korza Always getting sat on 

Windshield iviper Jennie Cackewski Never works 

Body Students 

Brakes We have none 

Chokes The faculty 

Operator Mr. Larkin 



SMITH ACADEMY 



27 



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28 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Cheer Leaders 




Shirley Labbee, Carolyn Kosior, Velma Omasta, Josephine Foster. 



They'll Never Forget 

JOAN BANGS Washington and Eddie 

SHIRLEY BETSOLD .... Her one working day at Howard Johnson's 

JOE BLYDA The nervousness of Prize Speaking night 

JENNIE CACKOWSKI Dates with Iggy 

SHIRLEY EBERLEIN Those back stair trips in Washington 

BERNIE KACENSKI .... Glory of winning the basketball league. '45 

MARIE KORZA Her inability to make that important decision 

NELLIE KORZA Her H. A. achievements 

CAROLYN KOSIOR That brief interlude of bliss in Washington 

SHIRLEY LABBEE . . . Her unquenchable love of cheerleading and dramatics 

WILLIAM MULLINS Agnes and Washington trip 

VELMA OMASTA The headaches of Student Council 

ROBERT PELC His joy in playing basketball 

LARRY STODDARD .... The adoration of the Sophomore and Junior girls 

EVELYN SZEWCZYK .... Her role in the senior play as "Miss Dibble" 

BARBARA TOBACCO ...... The "horrors" of bookkeeping class 

VICKY ZAWACKI Saturday night square dances 



SMITH ACADEMY 29 



Class Song 



''COMMENCEMENT DAY" 

By Churchill and Grendeil 
Here at the crossroads we're standing 
Viewing the years that have gone, 
Years that have been swift and fleeting, 
Joyful with laughter and song. 
Far ahead stretches the futures, 
Wonderful mystic of youth — 
Bright with her promise eternal, 
Bright with her promise of truth. 
Farewell classmates, teachers adieu — 
Here at the crossroads 
We must part from you. 
Hope calls us onward, 
Bidding us be true — 
But memory binds us ever 
To dear S. A. and you. 



Class Poem 



Standing with the future before us, 
With four years of S. A. in the past; 
We think of the fun and the pleasure — 
Bright mem'ries to which we hold fast. 

The years have been fast and fleeting, 
Filled with triumphs, and losses, too; 
But the class of forty-six will remember, 
And to S. A. be faithful and true. 

There is a feeling of sorrow at leaving 
The schoolmates and teachers so true, 
Though there is joy in the air at gaining 
The goal for which we strove all way through. 

The road has been a hard one; 
We are uncertain what the future will tell, 
But now to the schoolmates and teachers, 
The class of forty-six says — Farewell. 

JOAN BANGS. 

CLASS FLOWER CLASS COLORS 

American Beauty Rose Red and White 

MOTTO 
Do more; wish less 



30 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Student Council 




Front Row, left to right: Velma Omasta, Joseph Blyda, Robert Pelc, Dorothy Skar- 

zynski. 
Second Row, left to right: Stanley Kirejczyk, Margaret Vaehula, Bernard Kacinski, 

Virginia Yarrows, Laurence Stoddard. 



The Student Council of this year has 
been a successful one. Members chosen for 
offices in September were: President, Joseph 
Blyda; vice president, Robert Pelc; secre- 
tary, Velma Omasta; treasurer, Dorothy 
Skarzynski. 

We helped sponsor many parties given 
by the individual classes. 

On March 5, Smith Academy was invited 
to the annual small high school basketball 
tournament. The Student Council provided 
transportation, entertainment and made 
"twirlers" for the occasion. 

Five members represented S. A. at a 
State-wide Student Council Convention at 
Webster, Mass., May 4. Those represented 
were Laurence Stoddard, Joseph Blyda, 
Velma Omasta, Virginia Yarrows and Doro- 
thy Skarzynski. This convention was an all- 
day affair, with our morning and afternoon 



entertainment all planned. In the morning 
we listened to lectures by Mr. Smith, 
principal of Bartlett High School; Theo- 
dore Kokocinski, chairman of the Webster 
School Committee, and George Sellig, sup- 
erintendent of Webster-Dudley Schools. An- 
other interesting speaker on the morning 
program was Dr. Hawkes, superintendent 
of West Springfield Schools, who spoke on 
"Signals for Youth." At luncheon, we were 
all invited to the cafeteria where we en- 
joyed a turkey dinner. Our afternoon pro- 
gram included the nomination for officers 
for the following year. The meeting place 
next year, it was voted, is to be Wellesley. 
We were enteretained from 4 to 4:30 by the 
Bartlett High Glee Club and orchestra. 
Our most enjoyable and interesting day 
ended with dancing in the gymnasium. 

Continued on Page 48 



SMITH ACADEMY 



31 



School Paper Staff 




Front Row, left to right: Annette Kempisty, Evelyn Kacinski, Jennie Maiewski, Mar- 
garet Vachula, Joan Bangs, Marie Korza, Shirley Labbee, Evelyn Szewczyk, Shirley 
Betsold, Shirley Eberlein. 

Second Row, left to right: Joanne Howard, Bernard Sawicki, Janet Zuchowski, Dorothy 
Skarzynski, Virginia Yarrows, Janet Matuszewicz, Patricia Mullins, Helen Micha- 
loski, Mrs. Pruzynski, Nellie Korza, Miss Ryan, Lucy Zych, William Mullins, Velma 
Omasta, Laurence Stoddard, Stanley Kirejczyk, Mr. Larkin. 



Co-Editors Joan Bangs, Marie Korza 

Associate Editors Jennie Maiewski, Margaret Vachula 

Literary Editors Evelyn Szewczyk, Annette Kenpisty, Evelyn Kacinski 

Sports Editors Shirley Eberlein, Stanley Kirejczyk 

Art Editors Janet Zuchowski, Edward Betsold 

Feature Editors Shirley Labbee, Bernice Buchowski 

Business Manager William Mullins 

Assistant Business Managers Laurence Stodard, Bernard Sawacki 

Reporters Nellie Korza, Joanne Howard, Dorothy Skarzynski, 

Janet Matusewick, Patsy Mullins, Virginia Yarrows 

Typists Velma Omasta, Shirley Betsold, 

Helen Michalowski, Lucy Szych 
Faculty Advisers Miss Ryan, Mrs. Pruzynski, Mr. Larkin 



32 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Junior Class 




Front Row, left to right: John Fortch, Irene Kraulis, Staeia Kostek, Margaret Va- 

chula, Stanley Kirejczyk, Leonard Karpinski, Annette Kempisty, Joanne Howard, 

Helen Michalowski, Alex Widelo. 
Back Row, left to right: Mrs. O'Neill, Walter Kuchyt. James McGrath, Lucy Szych, 

Jennie Miewski, Daniel Fusek, Janet Zuchowski, Richard Labbee, Bernice Buchowski. 

Pauline Zapka, Bernard Sawicki, Monty Sikorski, Mr. Symancyk. 



JUNIOR CLASS NEWS 

The Junior Class officers were as follows: 
President, Stanley Kirejczyk; vice presi- 
dent, Leonard Karpinski; secretary, Staeia 
Kostek; treasurer, Arthur Proulx. Class 
representatives chosen for the Student 
Council were Margaret Vachula and Stan- 
ley Kirejczyk. Mrs. O'Neil and Mr. Sy- 
manczyk were class advisors. 

The annual Freshman reception was 
sponsored by the Juniors with these com- 
mittees: Reception. Leonard Karpinski. 
Annette Kempisty, Helen Michalowski. 
Bernice Buckowski, John Fortsch; tickets. 
Bernard Sawicki and Arthur Proulx; re- 
freshments, Margaret Vachula, Janet Zu- 
chowski, Lucy Szych; decorations, Daniel 
Fusek, Alex Widelo, Joanne Howard. Earl 



Halm and his "Rhythm Kings" provided 
the music for the evening. 

The class was well represented this year 
in the field of sports. On the soccer team 
were Stanley Kirejczyk. Monty Sikorski, 
Arthur Proulx and Walter Kuchet. John 
Fortsch was manager. Our class also pro- 
vided players for the basketball season. 
Arthur Proulx made a good record as a 
regular on the first team, while Stanley 
Kirejczyk and Monty Sikorski were strong 
players for the second team. John Fortsch 
was manager with Alex Widelo as assist- 
ant. In baseball. Arthur Proulx, Stanley 
Kirejczyk, Monty Sikorski. John Fortsch 
and Walter Kuchet participated. Alex Wi- 
delo is manager of the team. 

Continued on Page 48 



SMITH ACADEMY 



33 



Sophomore Class 




Front Row, left to right: Frances Zuchowski, Anne Cmeleski, Evelyn Cackowski, 
Laura Pelc, Dorothy Skarzynski, Jeanette Niewinski, Dorothy Liberacki, Ethel 
Omasta, Helen Szewczyk, Evelyn Kacinski, Janet Matusiewicz. 

Back Row, left to right: Bernard Wendolowski, Richard Karpinski, Carl Nartowicz, 
Richard Yandzinski, Teddy Besko, Mr. Larkin, John Foster, Miss Connelly, Carl 
Majesky, Carl Pelc, Francis Dugal, Joseph Parada, Charles Labbee. 



SOPHOMORE NEWS 

When school began in September, the 
Sophomore Class elected the following offi- 
cers: Dorothy Skarzynski, president; Laura 
Pelc, vice president; Jeannette Niewinski, 
secretary, and Dorothy Liberacki, treas- 
urer. 

The class held a Hallowe'en party Octo- 
ber 26. Later in the evening there was 
dancing. Committees in charge of the af- 
fair were: Refreshments, Laura Pelc, Ethel 
Omasta, Frances Zuchowski; entertainment, 
John Toczko, Charles Labbee, Richard Lab- 
bee; decoration, Jeanette Niewinski, Evelyn 
Kacinski, Helen Szewczyk, Richard Jand- 
zinski, Francis Dugal, Bernard Wendolow- 
ski, and tickets, Teddy Besko, Frank Ko- 
chan and Carl Pelc, generally supervised 



by our class officers, Mr. Larkin and Miss 
Connelly, although Frank Kochan, a class 
member, was placed in charge of all the 
committees. The party was a great success 
and was enjoyed by all those who attended. 
Debator Helen Szewczyk 

Sophomore Directory 

Star Athletes, John Foster, Carl Pelc, Frank 
Kochan and "Bernie" Wendoloski 



Shopper 

Visitor 

Class Van Johnson 

Store Keeper 

Don Juan 

Communication Expert 



Evelyn Cackowski 

Ann Cmelski 

Richard Karpinski 

Evelyn Kacinski 

Francis Dugal 

Richard Labbee 



Continued on Page 48 



34 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Freshman Class 




Front Row: Catherine O'Neal, Carol Howard, Barbara Ryan, Theresa Nartowicz, Alice 
Paniczko, Mildred Toczko, Lucy Zawacki, Francis Woodward, Josephine Foster, Nancy 
Holly, Irene Maciorowski, Alice Cybulski, Virginia Yarrows. 

Second Row, left to right: Pauline Vachula, John Kovalski, Martin Holich, Thomas 
Smith, Joseph Klimczyk, Edward Slych, Mrs. Muller, Alvin Rejnak, Samuel Kukucka, 
Mr. Bart, Robert Labbee, Roger Wendolowski, Edward Maskowicz, Robert Breor, 
Patricia Mullins. 



FRESHMEN NEWS 

At the opening of the school year, the 
Freshman Class chose the following offi- 
cers: President, Mildred Toczko; vice presi- 
dent, Frances Woodward; secretary, Lucy 
Zawacki; treasurer, Alice Paniczko. Vir- 
ginia Yarrows was selected as representa- 
tive on the Student Council. 

The class sponsored a dance on Feb- 
ruary 26, with the following committee 
members in charge: Katherine O'Neal, Mil- 
dred Toczko, Pat Mullins, Edward Betsold 
and Frances Woodward. Mrs. Muller and 
Mr. Bart, class advisors, supervised the 
dance. 

Several freshmen participated in school 
activities. Josephine Foster was chosen as 



one of the cheer leaders and John Kovalski 
played on the second basketball team. Rob- 
ert Breor and Walter Moskowicz also went 
out for baseball. The girls who played 
basketball were Virginia Yarrows, Pat 
Mullins, Lucy Zawacki. Nance Holley. Ed- 
ward Betsold and Robert Breor used their 
artistic talents to provide posters for the 
school play and John Kovalski was one of 
the stage crew members who redecorated 
the stage set. Barbara Ryan and Patricia 
Mullins played piano duets between the 
acts. 

Reporters for the school paper during 
the year included Pat Mullins and Virginia 
Yarrows, and Edward Betsold was one 
of the art editors. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



35 



Honor Essays 



DISCIPLINED DEMOCRACY 
For the first time since we entered upon 
our high school careers, graduation finds 
all the nations of the world seeking peace 
rather than engaging in war. This fact 
alone states only too clearly how important 
is the era which we are now entering. Dur- 
ing the graduations prior to ours, great 
emphasis was placed upon the need for 
strength of armed might and strength of 
character to bring to a successful conclu- 
sion the battle against the greed and deep 
hatred that were spreading horrid destruc- 
tion over much of the world. The guiding 
principle of almost every youth leaving 
high school, then, was based on the desire 
to enlist his service wherever he might be 
needed, and to bring once more to the 
devastated world the tranquillity, friendship 
and everlasting peace which it had not 
known for many years. Willing and eager, 
as the youth of America have always been, 
high school graduates were ready to do 
their part to obtain this ultimate goal — 
peace and freedom for all. 

With the passing of the year 1945, how- 
ever, many important and memorable 
events also passed. May found the end of 
the long bitter struggle on the European 
continent. Shortly afterward, in August, 
the Japanese realized that the American 
spirit which had kept our boys fighting 
fiercely could not be defeated, and sur- 
rendered. Thus, with the closing of that 
year, a new era, far greater and more im- 
portant than the last, was opened up for 
the youth of America. 

In this new era, the youth of today find 
themselves confronted with that ever- 
recurrent problem of peace, a peace which 
contains the embodiment of honor, justice 
and humanity. The events of the last few 
months have provided us with disturbing 
evidences of the urgent need for a straight- 
forward and unbiased understanding of 
international power. We are beginning to 
realize that the establishment of peace is 
an undertaking based upon a sympathetic 
and just regard for the rights of the com- 
mon people. This can not be attained, it 
seems, until the prejudices which exist be- 



tween the nations have been broken and 
all the peoples of the world have a willing- 
ness to cooperate intelligently in making a 
way for peace. The challenge of peace, 
therefore, lies largely in the field of human 
relationships. Thus, the time has come for 
the creation of a new order of thinking. 
This calls for the same courage and faith 
that our people displayed in the years of 
battle. We all know what a good world 
should be like, and we believe the good 
world will come, but only after a good deal 
of drudgery, and a great deal of unselfish 
sacrifice. We must work, and work hard, 
for the cause of triumphant democracy. 

This triumphant democracy, if it is to 
continue, must be a disciplined democracy, 
aware of the responsibilities which great 
privilege brings, and ready to work for a 
better country and a better world. Perhaps 
never before has there been a time in this 
country's history when the people had more 
to gain by hard work than they have at the 
present. Whole new frontiers are waiting 
to be explored, in science, industry, educa- 
tion and the world of entertainment. We 
pause on the threshold of an era which we 
hope will be one of international good-will 
in a rebuilt world into which war will 
never come as a destroyer. Yet, the attain- 
ment of all our hopes rests on the stern 
discipline of self and the unyielding ap- 
plication of energies, physical and mental, 
without which our present opportunity to 
go forward will pass without fulfillment. 

Since the cessation of war, the problems 
of the post-war era, the problems of labor 
and management, of supply and demand, of 
reconversion, of demobilization and re- 
habilitation, have shown us only too clearly 
the need for a disciplined democracy. The 
solution of all these problems will have to 
be reached through the self-made decisions 
on the part of the groups involved, rather 
than through legislation. It seems apparent 
that a development of wisdom, of enlight- 
ened self-interest and of sturdy patriotism 
will have to take place first. There must be 
a decrease in the spirit of what's in it for 
me, and a realization by all our people that 
greed produces greed; for as one writer 



36 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



put it, "when the wheel of selfishness is in 
full motion, it will not stop until the axis 
breaks." Whether our democratic system 
can be successfully applied in the future 
will depend upon ourselves as individuals. 
If we can show character as a result of our 
opportunities, if we can stand firm when 
things go wrong and assume our responsi- 
bilities as citizens and as a nation, then 
ours is a disciplined democracy. If we can 
act on the belief that honesty, integrity, 
industry, thrift and self-reliance are vir- 
tues still, if we will go forward in a spirit 
of tolerance, then ours is a disciplined 
democracy. 

Such a democracy will form an invincible 
army against the forces which make for 
evil, the forces of greed and selfishness. 
And to perfect such a disciplined democracy 
is one of our great responsibilities in the 
post-war world. In accepting that responsi- 
bility, the graduates of 194G might well 
make this pledge: "Shoulder to shoulder 
the youth of America will stand, trained in 
mind, unselfish in ambition, disciplined in 
spirit, to demonstrate to a world adrift that 
a disciplined, altruistic democracy is the 
fullest protection, the highest hope of our 
people." 

MARIE KORZA '46, 

Salutatorian. 



THE WORLD VIEW 
The United States was founded by men 
and women who sought to escape from the 
old world, and it has been populated to this 
day by an isolationist people. Because the 
American people settled on half a continent 
abundantly supplied with ample goods for 
everyone, they were, for centuries, able to 
be concerned only with what lay within 
their own boundaries. But it is one of his- 
tory's great ironies that the United States 
people themselves, by creating the atomic 
bomb, destroyed this isolationism over 
night. The waging of peace, we are told, is 
the next great enterprise of civilization. 
This enterprise cannot work without the 
leadership of the United States, which alone 
has the necessary qualifications of military 
power, industrial technique and political 
ideas. 

Let us first consider the world which 
awaits this leadership — this world where 



cities and towns lie devastated, where 
transportation is disrupted, where there are 
shortages of all articles necessary for 
happy living, where starvation or the threat 
of starvation looms, a threat to all man- 
kind. This world may not like us too well, 
because we are a nation whose people are 
well-fed, well-clothed and rich with luxuries 
which are to be found nowhere else on the 
face of the globe. Perhaps some people are 
fearful of us, thinking that we shall follow 
the example of other newly rich empires of 
the past, which entered the world only to 
dominate it and fatten on its resources. 

The basis of this mistrust may be rooted 
in the memories of our withdrawal from 
world problems after the close of World 
War I. We, at first, had been all for a 
League of Nations, which, we thought, 
would be the foundation of an everlasting 
peace. Because we were not ready for this 
change from isolationism, the United States 
did not join the league and her absence 
greatly weakened the effectiveness of that 
organization. However, our active leader- 
ship in the new world organization, the 
United Nations, has no doubt served to dis- 
pel some of the fears. Our shipments of 
food and clothes is another evidence of our 
awareness, that we must take our stand 
as one of the helping nations, for it is self- 
evident that peace cannot be attained when 
one half the world is in misery and the 
other half is living in luxury. 

In this post-war world we rclaize now 
how distances have shrunk when we con- 
sider that one can reach any part of the 
world in little more than twenty-four hours. 
With everyone so close, with nations living 
in each other's back yards, figuratively 
speaking, everyone must be interested in 
each other. No longer can a country isolate 
itself in this post-war era. Our nation, and 
all nations, must acquire a world point of 
view; we must act in the belief that a world 
administration for the world's people is 
the basis of world peace and security. For 
it is only world thought and action from a 
world viewpoint that will bring us secure 
peace. 

The post-war confusion and unrest we are 
experiencing- today is caused, in part, by 
the fact that people of the United States 
are adjusting their political system, their 



SMITH ACADEMY 



37 



economic system, and above all, their inner 
minds to the kind of world which their 
own genius unwittingly played a large part 
in inventing. If, in this American century, 
a tolerable and viable world civilization is 
to be built for the first time, if civilization 
as we know it is to continue at all, then it 
will have to be built on the original ideal 
of America and not on the ideals of mere 
abundance. Civilization cannot be built on 
a theory of luxury, for such a civilization 
will be no better than "a Hollywood scenic 
set with the glitter of chorus girls in front 
of it and nothing behind it." 

Thus it would seem that the problem of 
peace in our time is the establishment of 
a legal order, beyond and above the nation- 
states. This requires transferring parts of 
the sovereign authority of the existing na- 
tion-states to universal institutions; in 
other words, it means a world government 
capable of creating a universal law in 
world affairs. 

History has never before presented such 
a clear opportunity for the physically great- 
est world power to become also its greatest 
moral power. We must grasp this oppor- 
tunity. The United States must enter the 
world to serve it and save it, and not 
establish an American empire. We must 
maintain a strong and disciplined democ- 
racy; we must cherish the ideal of freedom 
at home, and encourage its growth through- 
out the world; and we must adopt the world 
view in our political, social and economic 
thinking. We must enter the world of today 
to serve it and save it — that is our great 
responsibility with the new era before us. 
LET US FACE IT. 

JOAN BANGS '46, 

Valedictorian. 



FREEDOM, AMERICA'S MOST 
CHERISHED GIFT 
As the doors of high school close behind 
us, shutting away all the familiar days 
spent among our teachers and classmates, 
we find ourselves confronted with another 
door — the door which leads to our new lives 
— -lives as American citizens. And behind 
the door stands golden opportunity — and 
grave responsibility. We face the oppor- 
tunity to take our places in this post-war 



world, a world which must be better and 
stronger after the severe test of war to 
which it has been subjected. We face the 
responsibility to uphold the duties of a true 
American citizen, and to preserve and de- 
fend freedom, America's most cherished 
gift. 

All our lives we have been taught that 
America is the land of the free; that every 
person is entitled to life, liberty and the 
pursuit of happiness. We have always taken 
these things for granted. It took war to 
teach most people that our liberty is some- 
thing precious, like a fragile flower which 
must be nurtured and cared for in order to 
have it bloom beautifully for everyone to 
enjoy. It took war to make us understand 
that unless all civilized countries are free, 
no one country can progress in freedom. 

When we speak of freedom, it is im- 
portant to realize that our American idea 
of freedom differs from the totalitarian 
idea. Fascist governments, too, talk of 
freedom — but the freedom they allow has 
for its objectives an economic security. In 
this security, there is a distinct limitation 
on earning power, so that a man has to eat, 
drink and dress according to an income set 
by th estate, and not according to his own 
ability or his own desire. Under a totali- 
tarian government, the individual is not 
free to think, free to speak, free to read, 
free to form his own opinion, or to con- 
tribute his responsibility to the community 
in which he lives. He is denied the right to 
question. The society in which he lives is a 
set society, in which he is a subordinate, 
ruled by his masters. Under such a govern- 
ment, the individual may be secure, but he 
has no responsibility, for that is exercised 
by his ruler; thus, he is not truly free. He 
believes what he is told to believe, or he is 
purged. That is what it means to be a free 
man or a free woman in a fascist state. 

Our democratic concept of freedom is far 
different. We know that the democratic 
form of government is a living, growing 
thing, not a set, rigid rule. We still have 
not built the perfect democracy our fore- 
fathers envisioned. But we have the free- 
dom to think, to speak, to question, and to 
go on with the work of perfecting our free 
democratic society and improving our own 
individual lives. We must never forget that 



38 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



man was not always free in this land of 
ours. He did not always have the right to 
think, say and read what he pleased, to 
take part in making and enforcing the 
laws he had to obey. Men died for these 
things. The soldiers of George Washington 
fought and died at Valley Forge to pur- 
chase this freedom for us. The men who 
fought and died in the recent war have 
preserved freedom for us, and given us a 
chance to extend that freedom. The found- 
ers of our democracy prized some things 
more than life itself, among them indi- 
vidual freedom. They cared for it, and 
unless we care for it, we shall lose it. 

Our freedom offers equal opportunity — 
it demands equal responsibility. The Bill of 
Rights guarantees our rights. But it also 
clearly implies a duty to observe the spirit, 
as well as the letter, of these freedoms. It 
obligates us to use them fairly and wisely, 
so as not to injure the general welfare. 
Too many today have forgotten this obli- 
gation. They use our precious freedom of 
speech as a license for wholesale attack 
against religions or races, or classes of 
other good American citizens. Others dis- 
tort facts, misplace emphasis and stir up 



controversy, just for the sake of being 
conspicuous and sensational. We should use 
the great freedom of speech and freedom 
of the press with a sense of their responsi- 
bility — with accuracy, fairness and tem- 
perance. As individuals, we must not use 
our freedoms in way which, to other peoples 
and other nations, seem to demonstrate that 
these freedoms lead to a disorder which the 
world, in its present weakened condition, 
can not stand. 

It is not easy to be a good citizen. The 
job of good citizenship must be learned 
through effort. The opportunity to maintain 
our freedoms is ours today, but it may not 
linger. Events abroad or selfishness at home 
can wreck our dreams of building a new 
world where freedom is secure unless we, 
every last one of us, look to our duties. We 
cannot fail — we dare not fail. The time 
of responsibility is upon us. It is our duty 
to preserve the hard-earned freedom we 
now possess, and to spread that freedom 
all over the world. This is one of our grave 
responsibilities in the post-war world. 

EVELYN SZEWCZYK '46, 

Third Honors. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



39 



Basketball 




Front Row: Arthur Proulx, William Mullins, Captain Bernard Kacinski, Robert Pelc, 
Joseph Blyda, John Foster. 

Back Row, left to right: Ass't Mgr. Alex Widelo, Carl Jelc, Stanley Kirejczyk, Coach 
Symancyk, Monty Sikorski, Bernard Wendolowski, Mgr. John Fortch. 



Although finishing in fifth place in the 
Hampshire circuit and failing to repeat as 
the league champs, S. A. always fought to 
the last and lost a few contests by close 
margins. S. A.'s four wins out of twelve 
Hampshire League contests were over 
Smith School and Arms Academy, two 
apiece. S. A. lost a 23-22 thriller to the 
Hampshire League champs, Amherst, in 
overtime. In their second contest with Hop- 
kins, S. A. led throughout the contest but 
faltered at the end to lose by a two-point 
margin, 28-26. 

The Smith basketeers probably played 
their best game of the season in the small 
high school tournament at the MSC cage in 



Amherst when they were stacked up against 
a fast Williams quintet. Williams was the 
favorite and S. A. was not given a chance 
to win. But the Hatfield cagers almost up- 
set the dope, for it took a last-quarter 
rally by Williams to come out on top by a 
36-33 score. With Captain Bernard Kacen- 
ski netting 17 points, S. A. led at half time, 
29 to 15. John Foster threw in 7 points, Co- 
Captain Bob Pelc 5, and Archie Proulx 4. 
The boys played their level best and gave 
it all they had. Though they failed to win, 
the Symancyk-coached cagers proved they 
were not to be taken lightly, and showed 
good sportsmanship as well as excellent 
basketball technique. 

Continued on Page 48 



40 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Soccer Team 




Front Row: Myron Sikorski, Robert Pelc, Bernard Kacinski, William Mullins, Richard 

Labbee. 

Second Row, left to right: Coach Symancyk, John Kovalski, Walter Kuchet, Joseph 

Blyda, John Foster, Stanley Kircjczyk, Teddy Resko, Roger Wendolowski, Mgr. Fortch. 



After winning two straight Hampshire 
League championships, S. A. broke even in 
their six 1946 Hampshire League tilts to 
take second place as runner up to East- 
hampton, 1946 champion. The Hatfield 
booters, with Coach Symancyk making his 
debut at S. A., started slowly by losing 
their first two contests to Hopkins and 
Easthampton by one-goal margins. But in 
their last four tilts the lads came through 
with a bang, winning over Hopkins and 
Smith School twice, while suffering their 
second defeat at the hands of the eventual 
champs from Easthampton. In two inde- 
pendent contests with Deerfield Academy's 



Jayvees, the S. A. booters won two hard 
overtime battles by the identical scores of 
2 to 1. Each time Smith came from behind 
to tie and win, and in the last game a last- 
quarter goal forced the game into overtime. 



Summary: 








Smith Academy 





Hopkins 


1 


Smith Academy 


1 


Easthampton 


2 


Smith Academy 


2 


Smith School 


1 


Smith Academy 


2 


Hopkins 


1 


Smith Academy 


1 


Easthampton 


2 


Smith Academy 


1 


Smith School 





Smith Academy 


2 


Deefield J. V. 


1 


Smith Academy 


2 


Deefield J. V. 


1 



SMITH ACADEMY 



41 



Literary 



GETTING THAT U. S. HISTORY 
PAPER WRITTEN 

Writing- a history assignment is more 
painful than falling down stairs. It may be 
that the subject is just too boring, or it 
may be that I am too stupid. Anyhow, try- 
ing to think of something to write is some- 
times like trying to remember the first 
thing I did after I was born. When given 
the lesson, I do not give it a second thought; 
it seems that simple, until I try getting it 
down on paper. The teacher is very con- 
siderate; he gives two topics and we are 
to write on one. Usually I have never heard 
or read anthing about either of them, but 
sometimes I might vaguely recall hearing 
just a very little on the subjects, some 
months or so before. So choosing one of the 
topics becomes a matter of "out goes 
y-o-u," or flipping a coin. 

After some fussing around, I finally 
select a topic, to my regret. Now to get 
some reference books — oh, where are they? 
Always when they are wanted it's impossi- 
ble to locate them. A few hours later I care- 
fully dust the books and begin to look up 
some information. Why there's a whole 
chapter on my topic! What luck! Ten 
minutes later I take back this happily 
made exclamation, for the contents of the 
chapter are more confusing than three oc- 
topi entangled. 

I throw up my hands in despair and quit. 

While in the midst of a blood-chilling 
murder-suspense drama being broadcast 
over the radio, and munching a carrot, I am 
struck by an inspiration which sweeps a 
sudden frenzy over me. I rush for a pen — 
darn it — it's gone — oh, here it is — and then 
for the paper. Excitedly I take a swift run 
and slide on the bright shining waxed lino- 
leum from the kitchen door to my desk in 
the living room, leaving my shoe nails be- 
hind. I joyfully dip the pen and set the 
clean white sheet of paper before me and 
scratch out "Jackson was the most rugged 
and — and" — and my inspiration has taken 
a journey! 

An hour later I may be found still medi- 
tating, or else grieving, over the lost in- 
spiration. I still hold the pen in hand, ready 



to write unexpectedly, but the ink has al- 
ready dried long ago, and if another idea 
came to me, by the time I had wet the 
pen again it would be gone. So it might 
pay to keep it wet, in case of moment's 
notice. 

"Eleven o'clock," sings out the cuckoo. 
Sadly I watch the wooden object recede and 
the small door close for a whole short hour. 
I wonder what makes the bird say "cuckoo"; 
I'll have to investigate one of these days. 
My, but that's something worth writing 
about — not like this boring lesson. 

Oh, yes — the history lesson — it still isn't 
written. Oh, well, I probably will do it to- 
morrow. Tomorrow? Tomorrow? Did I say 
"Tomorrow"? Why didn't I think of it be- 
fore? Tomorrow is Saturday! 



ON IDLING 

"When I was your age, I never had any 
time for idling." This is a very famous line 
in our family. I hear it spoken day in and 
day out. The dictionary claims that "idling" 
means "time spent doing nothing." After 
checking the definition of "idling," I think 
that I shall fling anything that is at hand 
at the next person who accuses me of 
idling. After all, I do not think that a per- 
son should be expected to act like a poor 
driven slave in her own home. As to 
whether I am rightly accused of idling — 
well, I shall leave that to you to decide. I 
proudly claim that I never did such an out- 
landish thing — or rarely ever. 

Well, to go on. Monday through Saturday 
I have to feed those pesky old chickens be- 
fore I can sit down to eat my own supper. 
As each day comes, I have to rush to school, 
knock my brains out studying and finally 
get home to find work silently waiting for 
me. Saturday is the busiest day of all. I 
get up at about 7 o'clock at the latest, eat 
my breakfast and then begin to clean. I 
clean the whole house for the rest of the 
day. Of course I take time out for my din- 
ner. Yet by the time I am through with 
house cleaning, I feel so exhausted that I 
am on the verge of falling asleep. All of 
a sudden little sister brings me back to 
reality with a couple of pinches and orders 



42 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



me to button up her overshoes because she 
wants to go outdoors sliding. Then comes 
the usual late afternoon chores and the 
Saturday evening chores. After the week- 
end is over, I get back to the same old 
school-day routine. 

Now, to conclude, I will say that if I 
hear the word "idling" said to me just a 
few more times, I think that I will go just 
"plain loco." 

JENNIE MAIEWSKI '47. 



VICTORY 

V — is for valiant men who fight. 
I — is for industry, strength and might. 
C — Stands for courage brave and true. 
T — is for triumph the whole way through. 
— is for offensive spread far and wide. 
R — is the Red Cross at their side. 
Y — are the Yankees all over the world, 
Who keep the Stars and Stripes unfurled. 

VELMA OMASTA '46. 



RENEWAL 

Softly the last rays of sunshine 
Retreat behind shadowy hills. 

Each rose-tinted cloud in the heavens 
Reflects beauty and glory and thrills. 

Slowly, the long gray fingers. 

Of dusk o'ertake their play 
And soon transform the color 

To a cool and shadowy gray. 

And then vas the color deepens 
The earth lies as if in di-eam. 

Remains for one perfect moment 
All peaceful, calm, serene — 

The troubles and deep desperations 
That meant so much during day, 

Like the fast-fading rays of daylight 
Dissolve and fade away. 

Then, as the velvety heavens 

Star-studded seem to stand guard, 

The activities and all of the sorrows 
Of day, for the moment retard. 

And we, inspired by the difference, 

Begin again to take heart, 
And, like tomorrow's sunshine 

We, too, anew can start. 

EVELYN SZEWCZYK '46. 



(This essay, written by Joan Bangs, '46, 
won the one hundred dollar inter-school 
prize and the twenty-five dollar school prize 
awarded by the B. P. 0. E. of Northampton 
in the annual Flag Day Essay Contest 
sponsored by the Elks.) 



UNITED STATES FLAG— SYMBOL 
OF DEMOCRACY 

Flashing its broad ribbons of lily and 
rose, the Star Spangled Banner has floated 
for over one hundred and fifty years. An 
American, looked at the sacred symbol of 
his country waving "o'er the land of the 
free and the home of the brave," can feel 
a shiver of the deepest pride quiver through 
him. Now, more than ever before, we ap- 
preciate the Stars and Stripes, while we 
remember the millions who have been de- 
fending it and the thousands who have died 
for it during the war years so shortly end- 
ed. The proud symbol of the freedom, the 
equality, the justice, and the humanity for 
which our country stands, the United States 
flag waves, the majestic monarch of the 
clouds. The thirteen stripes represent the 
traditions and ideals of the thirteen colo- 
nies, who so nobly struggled for, and so 
truly laid the foundation of this great 
independent nation. The forty-eight stars 
stand for the union of our forty-eight 
states, held together by the bond of our 
National Government. 

Standing with Freedom's soil beneath our 
feet and watching- Freedom's banner 
streaming overhead, we feel within us a 
deep pride in the principles of our democ- 
racy, for which men fight and die. Now 
that peace once more rolls its chariot over 
the land, the proud emblem of our chosen 
land repeats to the heart of every American 
the glory for which it stands. It symbolizes 
not only what we are living for today, but 
also the history of our nation; not only the 
ideals, traditions and free institutions of 
our Republic, but also the expansion and 
territorial development of our United 
States. 

Stately and staunch, its broad folds, 
washed in the blood of th ebrave. redden 
the sky. We think, as we see it, of the red 
which stands for justice and the white 
which shall go down to posterity repre- 



SMITH ACADEMY 



43 



senting liberty. Little by little, we begin to 
realize the vast meaning of that banner 
waving majestically over our heads. A 
government "of the people, by the people, 
and for the people," is the essence of its 
meaning. As it hovers above our heads, it 
takes but little to think of Washington, 
father of our country; Lincoln, freer of 
the slaves; or even Betsy Ross, maker of 
this symbolic banner — all these, founders 
of democracy. It takes but little to think of 
the American soldiers bleeding at Valley 
Forge, falling at Antietam, storming the 
beach-heads of foreign shores, the Marines 
raising the flag on I wo Jima; the sailors 
manning the guns of our Navy's ships — 
all these, defenders of democracy. It takes 
but little to think of children playing in 
school yards where the flag flies, studying 
in classrooms where the flag stands — all 
these, the inheritors of democracy. 

Yes, the flag passing by is more than a 
banner, it is the symbol of equal justice, 



right, and law; it is a sign of a great and 
strong nation. Pride, glory and honor live 
in its colors. More than one hundred and 
thirty million people owe allegiance to it. 
It is the banner of a vast assemblage com- 
posed of nearly every race in the world, but 
all bound by the same bond — the bond of 
loyalty and devotion to the flag which sym- 
bolizes a democracy of liberty, equality 
and justice. It has ever stood for the 
triumph of these principles. Both in peace 
and in war, this glorous banner can never 
fail to inspire us all; for we always re- 
member those defenders who have so loy- 
ally given their lives that its principles 
can live on. Warding away the battle 
strokes, the flag hovers, the symbol of the 
principles of the land of the RED, WHITE 
and BLUE — freedom, equality, justice and 
humanity — all tied by the ribbon of democ- 
racy. 

JOAN BANGS '46. 



44 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Thespians 




Front Row: Robert Pelc, Annette Kempisty, Evelyn Szewczyk, Shirley Labbee, Carolyn 
Kosior, Joan Bangs, Shirley Retsold, Velma Omasta, Charles Labbee. 
Second Row, left to right: Bernard Kacinski, Richard Labbee, Bernard Sawicki, Mar- 
garet Vachula, Joanne Howard, Bernice Buchowski, Helen Szewczyk, Miss Ryan, 
William Mullins, Leonard Karpinski, Lawrence Stoddard, Alex Widelo. 



SENIOR PLAY 
A play concerning the problems confront- 
ing a girl who is at the borderline between 
adolescence and young womanhood, entitled 
"Pickles Becomes a Lady," was cleverly en- 
acted by the Smith Academy Thespians on 
January 30. The theme presented the en- 
thusiastic audience with a mixture of 
comedy, melodrama, romance and mystery. 
The convincing portrayal of Pickles, a typi- 
cal tomboy, v. as skillfully given by Shirley 
Labbee. a veteran of last year's play. The 
setting was the Eibble School for Girl?, 
headed by the rather stem Miss Dibble, 
cleverly interpreted by Evelyn Szewczyk. 
Both the elements of romance and comedy 
were developed by the lisping Mag, played 
by Margaret Vachula, and the stuttering 
Blimp, realistically acted by Bernard Sa- 



wicki. Charles Labbee met the demands of 
the difficult role of Mr. Burleigh, the comi- 
cal school janitor who taught Pickles the 
methods of jiu jitsu. Because of her popu- 
larity. Pickles aroused the enmity of Lillian 
Haller, the school politician, sincerely por- 
trayed by Carolyn Kosior. Robert Pelc as 
Lieutenant Hamilton and Annette Kem- 
pisty in her excellent performance of the 
charming Miss Martin, added another bit 
of romance. A touch of mystery was pro- 
vided when Duke and Pete, the villians, 
made their appearance onto the stage. 
These parts were interpreted by Leonard 
Karpinski and Alex Widelo, respectively. 
Schoolmates of Pickles were acted out by 
Jeanne Howard, Velma Omasta, Shirley 
Bestold and Joan Bangs. The play abounded 
Continued on Page 48 



SMITH ACADEMY 



45 



Pro Merito 




Front Row : Stacia Kostek, Joan Bangs, Marie Korza, Jennie Miewski. 
Back Row, left to right: Margaret Vachula, Bernard Sawicki, Mrs. Pruzynski, Miss 
Ryan, Stanley Kirejczyk, Evelyn Szewczyk. 



Senior Officers 

President — Joan Bangs 
Secretary-Treasurer — Marie Korza 

Junior Officers 

President — Jennie Maiewski 
Vice President — Stacia Kostek 
Secretary-Treasurer — Stanley Kirejczyk 



A delegation from the Smith Academy 
Pro Merito chapter attended the district 
convention held in Amherst High School 
last November. A pleasant moment for our 
group was the chat with Bill Wendoloski, 
'45, a freshman at Amherst College. We 
stopped at Bill's fraternity house on our 
arrival in Amherst and were lucky enough 
to find him in. An interesting feature of 
the convention was the bus tour of Am- 
herst. Guides pointed out homes of Am- 
herst authors, and stops were made at both 



colleges, where the groups were conducted 
through laboratories and museums. A din- 
ner in the Amherst High School cafeteria 
was followed by a business meeting, at 
which Stacia Kostek spoke for our group. 
At the close of the business meeting, Pro- 
fessor Maxwell Goldberg, of M. S. C., gave 
readings from New England poets. Prin- 
cipal Perry, of Amherst High School, en- 
tertained with a ventriloquist act and there 
was music by three Amherst high school 
girls. 

The annual state convention, held in 
Northampton High School in May, found 
Smith Academy well represented. Joan 
Bangs spoke for Smith Academy at the roll- 
call report. Annual state elections were 
followed by a luncheon in the school cafe- 
teria. Principal James P. Reed, of Hopkins, 
gave an illustrated lecture with colored 
films as the closing feature. 



46 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Washington Trip 



April 15 



At 7.20 this morning 13 seniors boarded 
the train at Northampton for the first lap 
of their Washington trip. Everyone was 
excited and happy and for some, it was 
their first train ride. During the ride from 
Springfield to New York we were intro- 
duced to the other members of our party 
from South Deerfield and Powers Institute 
and also to Mrs. Battey, our chaperone, all 
of whom we became further acquainted 
with, especially the latter. When we ar- 
rived in New York we walked a short dis- 
tance and then boarded buses which took 
us to the ferry. The day wasn't very clear 
but we saw a hazy outline of the Statue of 
Liberty. The only exciting incident of this 
ride occurred when one of the girls from 
Powers lost her hat, which was blown into 
New York Harbor. From the ferry we could 
see all the huge ocean liners and the 
smaller tugs and all sorts of harbor boat 
traffic. Arriving in Jersey we boarded the 
train for Washington. The highlight of this 
ride was eating luncheon on the dining car, 
which was a first experience for most of 
us, auto-traveling people. 

About quarter after six we arrived in the 
spacious and imposing Union Station in 
Washington. We were told that this station 
could hold 50,000 troops and also that it 
was forced to turn people away during 
Christmas because it was filled to capacity. 
A very short walk brought us to our head- 
quarters in the Hotel Plaza, where we had 
our dinner. One feature of the meal was 
beans — a dish that would not be uncommon 
to us in the next four days. After dinner 
quite a few of the group went for a walk 
with Mrs. Battey, to see the sights. It seems 
that the group also met two sailors, and 
those very two sailors were the cause of 
keeping the girls awake most of the night — 
or rather the early morning. That night 
we learned why hotels had house detectives 
— and also the rules to abide by while stay- 
ing at the hotel. 

April 16 

Tuesday most of us found it hard to get 
up, after having stayed awake most the 



night. But we got off to an early start at 
eight-thirty. Buses took us from the hotel 
to the famous Franciscan Monastery where 
we attended mass and took pictures of the 
beautiful grounds. After the service we 
again boarded buses which took us to the 
Zoological Gardens. We had a limited time 
at this place and spent it rushing from one 
building to another, trying to see all. I 
think the snake house attracted the most 
attention here. 

After luncheon back at the hotel, buses 
again took us for a tour of the city and out 
through Arlington National Cemetery and 
Mt. Vernon. We saw the Lee Mansion, the 
Memorial Amphitheatre, the mast of the 
Maine, and the tomb of the Unknown Sol- 
dier at 3 o'clock and saw how the guard 
is changed before the tomb. It is done in a 
very impressive military manner. On the 
route hack over the Mt. Vernon Memorial 
Highway, the party stopped at the Lincoln 
Memorial, beautifully simple in structure, 
with the huge statue of Lincoln seated in a 
massive chair. 

On returning to the hotel, we were told 
to be ready for a visit to the Congressional 
Library. Here we saw the original Declara- 
tion of Independence and numerous other 
historical articles, and were impressed by 
the magnificent architecture and beautiful 
mosaics. After such a busy day everyone 
was glad to settle down early for a good 
night of much-needed sleep. 

April 17 
After breakfast, the main dish of which 
comprised eggs, another food we became 
extremely well acquainted with, we were 
taken to the Bureau of Printing and En- 
graving. Here we saw money being printed, 
cut and stacked and also saw some $10,000 
bills being printed. After leaving this bu- 
reau our next stop was the Washington 
Monument. Quite a few of the group de- 
cided to climb to the top, not dreaming 
what was in store for them. About the first 
ten or fifteen flights weren't at all bad, but 
pretty soon, say about the twenty-fifth 
flight, off came coats and jackets and out 
came handkerchiefs to mop sweating brows. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



47 



By the time the top was reached all we had 
to look back on was fifty flights of stairs, 
with a total of 898 steps. Most of us who 
walked up took the elevator down. 

O'.r schedule for the afternoon listed the 
long ride to Annapolis. Here we went 
through Carver Hall and mausoleum of 
John Paul Jones in the Academy Chapel. 
At Annapolis we saw a full dress parade 
of the cadets and everyone marveled at the 
precision with which they marched. After 
dinner at 7.00, we were free for the rest of 
the night. Some of us went out in groups 
and one certain group was taken into a 
night club in Washington by their chap- 
erone, Al Vachula, S. A. '44, a Marine. Some 
of this group felt rather ill-at-ease and 
caused the waiters a great deal of trouble 
with their orders. Another group, one half 
of which were sailors, the other half S. A. 
girls, occupied the whole back row of the 
Palace Theatre. Need I say which night 
was most enjoyed? 

April 18 

Today we visited the Smithsonian Insti- 
tute and the New National Gallery, the 
Supreme Court Building and the Capitol, 
ending our tour about 3.30. Then Mrs. 
Battey told us she didn't want to see us 
until 7.00 which would be dinner time. We 
were more than thankful for those four 
hours — the only four that we had free the 
whole time. We wandered about and punc- 
tually came back to the hotel at 7.00. She 
told us to be ready for 8.00 sharp for a 
tour of Washington. But three S. A. girls 
(not mentioning names, of course) decided 
they would rather not go; so at 8.00 when 
Mrs. Battey Counted noses, a thing she 
quite frequently did, she found three miss- 
ing. But when she came back the three 
were in their room — in pajamas — trying 
to keep straight faces when she came in to 
hear their alibis and to tell them they were 
restricted to their rooms for the rest of the 
night. If Mrs. Battey couldn't sleep that 
night it was because her ears were ringing. 



April 19 

After an early breakfast at 6.30 the 
party assembled and walked to the Union 
Station for the last time. We got on our 
private car — private much to our dismay — 
for a little further on two cars of Annapolis 
cadets boarded the train. They were firmly 
made to understand by Mrs. Battey that 
this was a private car and no one was al- 
lowed on it. As ours was the last car they 
couldn't even walk through. The ride to 
New York was rather uneventful. Motor 
coaches met us at the train and carried us 
to the Pennsylvania Hotel. What amazed 
us most was the contrast between this hotel 
and the Hotel Plaza. In New York we 
reveled in the luxury of radios in each room 
and soft, comfortable beds. That night we 
went to the Radio City Music Hall and saw 
a special Easter stage show and the movie, 
"The Gre<m Years." After this we went to 
Rockefeller Center and view New York at 
night from seventy floors above the street. 
By the time we reached the hotel that 
night everyone was glad to get to sleep. 
April 20 

The next morning we were free to roam 
the stores of New York. Most of us brought 
back something from Saks', Mac^y's or 
Gimbel's. Back at the hotel at noon, the 
party packed and left at about 2.20. From 
that time until 4.00 buses took us on a long 
tour around the city and through China- 
town. Here we went into a Temple of Con- 
fusius and a building called the Rescue 
Society. During the walk around Chinatown 
we passed shops in which were hung ducks, 
roasted without being dressed. The odors 
in Chinatown were not very pleasant and 
it was rather a relief to get on the clean 
bus and be on our way. The bus took us 
to the Grand Central Terminal. Here we 
boarded a car which wasn't a private car 
for once, for Northampton. At about quar- 
ter after nine we arrived back in familiar 
old Northampton, tired, happy and con- 
tented. 

SHIRLEY EBERLEIN. 



48 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Third year students have also been ac- 
tive in dramatics. Bernard Sawicki has 
served as president of the Thespians, and 
Annette Kempisty as vice president. Other 
Juniors taking part in the senior play 
were Margaret Vachula, Leonard Karpin- 
ski, Alex Widelo and Joanne Howard. John 
Fortsch and Stanley Kirejczyk were as- 
sistant stage manager for the production, 
and Bernice Buckowski was one of the 
prompters. 

Junior declamations resulted in the 
choice of ten Juniors to speak at the annual 
prize speaking contest: Stacia Kostek, Irene 
Kraulis, Margaret Vachula, Bernice Buc- 
kowski, Annette Kempisty, Stanley Kirej- 
czyk, John Fortsch, Bernard Sawicki, Alex 
Widelo and Daniel Fusek. 

After hearing the Seniors tell about 
their wonderful trip to Washington and 
New York this spring, we look forward 
with added pleasure to being Seniors. Next 
year we can go! 



BASKETBALL 



Summary : 

Smith Academy 13 

Smith Academy 18 

Smith Academy 35 

Smith Academy 15 

Smith Academy 26 

Smith Academy 29 

Smith Academy 37 

Smith Academy 20 

Smith Academy 21 

Smith Academy 14 

Smith Academy 25 

Smith Academy 39 

Smith Academy 37 

Smith Academy 22 

Smith Academy 26 

Smith Academy 20 

Smith Academy 31 

Smith Academy 44 

Smith Academy 33 



Tech 

Easthampton 

Northampton 

St. Michael's 

Northampton 

Easthampton 

Smith School 

Amherst 

Hopkins 

Deerfield 

South Hadley 

Arms Academy 

Smith School 

Amherst 

Hopkins 

Deerfield 

South Hadley 

Arms Academy 

Williams 



47 
57 
45 
28 
39 
36 
21 
40 
49 
42 
41 
29 
20 
23 
28 
43 
51 
25 
36 



THESPIANS 
in splendid characterizations, with a thick 
vrein of genuine humor running throughout 
and was so successfully given that on Feb- 
ruary 6, it was repeated. 

The play was directed by Miss Mary 
Kyan, head of the English department, with 
Helen Szewczyk and Bernice Buckowski as 
student prompters. Richard Labbee was 
business manager, assisted by John Fortsch 
and Stanley Kirejczyk. The appropriate 
setting was decorated by Bernard Kacen- 
ski, William Mullins, Lawrence Stoddard 
and John Kovalski. The properties were 
taken care by Nellie Korza, Vicky Zawacki 
and Pauline Widelo with the aid of Miss 
Connelly as faculty advisor. 



SOPHOMORE 
Expert Marksmen (Ask Tel. Co.), 

Charles Labbee and Joseph Porada 



Trapper Twins 

Expert Accountant 

Class "Romeo" 

Cyclist 

Bradstreet Farmer 

Waitress 

Dancer 

Truck Driver 

Softball Player 

Typist 

Hair Dresser 

Artist 



Carl Majesky and 

Frank Kochan 

Carl Nartowicz 

"Corky" McGrath 

Richard Jandzinski 

"Teddy" Besko 

Dorothy Liberacki 

Janet Matusewicz 

Dorothy Skarzynski 

Ethel Omasta 

Jeanette Niewinski 

Laura Pelc 

Frances Zuchowski 



STUDENT COUNCIL 
A semi-formal prom was held on June 6, 
which proved to be very successful. Mem- 
bers of the Student Council were on dif- 
ferent committees and the chairmen for 
the affair were Velma Omasta and Joseph 
Blyda. Members of the student body were 
on special committees with the councilmen. 
We all wish that next year's Student 
Council will be even more successful in 
their undertakings. 



IDENTIFICATIONS 

Evelyn Szewczyk 5 & 8 Robert Pelc 10 Marie and Nellie 13 

Laurence Stoddard 6 Velma Omasta Korza 14 

7 Bernard Kacenski 11 Victoria Zawacki 15 

9 Shirlev Betsold 12 Joan Bang's 16 



Barbara Tobacco 
Shirley Labbee 



Carolyn Kosior 
Pauline Widelo 
William Mullins 
Shirlev Eberlein 



Informals 




Identification — Page 48 



50 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



School Autographs 




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SMITH ACADEMY 



Autographs 



52 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Autographs 



Compliments of 




WALTER KUCHYT 


MacDONALD'S 


Manager 


SHOE SHOP 


First National Stores 


185 Main St. Northampton 


55 Main Street Hatfield 






H. J. MORSE 


^^^^^, 


Agrico 


•* FLOWERS 






HATFIELD 


PORTER-McLEOD MACHINE TOOL CO., INC. 


Hatfield, Mass. 



A. E. CELALKA 

Asgrow Seeds 
HATFIELD 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


Compliments of 

GEORGE H. HOWARD 

INSURANCE 

62 Main St. Tel. 3013 
HATFIELD 


Compliments of 

SQUARE DEAL 
MOTOR SALES 


HELENS BEAUTY SALON 

Specializing in All Branches of 
Beauty Culture 
Helen Gizienski, Prop. 245 Main St 
Phone 733-M Northampton, Mass. 


Compliments of 
YEARBOOK STAFF 



HARLOW & FENNESSEY 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
OF ALL KINDS 



PIERCES PAINT STORE 

196 Main Street Northampton 

PAINT— WALLPAPER 
AND GLASS 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 



C. F. ROBERTS 



NATIVE POULTRY AND EGGS 



Telephone 2591 



Chestnut St. 




CONN. RIVER STOCK FARM— Home of Peter Song— 2.00 



DONNIS LUMBER CO. 



HATFIELD 



LaFLEUR BROS. 


Compliments of 


The Paint People 


WOLFRAM'S 


45 King Street Northampton 


GENERAL STORE 


Tel. 374-M 


North Hatfield 



McCALLUM'S 

NORTHAMPTON'S LARGEST 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

PHONE 1310 



Compliments of 



SIDNEY G. CARL 



Packer of 



HAVANA SEED TOBACCO 



Compliments of 



B. & B. RESTAURANT 



Manager, Paul Stefaneik 



Prospect St. 



Hatfield 






Compliments of 




BOARD OF 


SELECTMEN 




HATFIELD, MASS. 


Compliments of 


A Real Good Place 


L ABBE E'S 


to Eat 


SERVICE STATION 






BECKMANN'S 


State Road 




West Hatfield 


Northampton 




Athletic Supplies 


Compliments of 






T. A. PURSEGLOVE CO. 


DAVID BOOT SHOP 






15 State St. 


Northampton 






Northampton 



HERRICK STUDIO 


Class Photographer 


100 Main St. Phone 1919 


NORTHAMPTON 




Business Managers 


Compliments of 


Mullins 


HATFIELD GARAGE 


Stoddard 




McGrath 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


Bill 


The BEE HIVE STORE 


Larry 


Shoes and Furnishings 


Corky 


29 Main Street Northampton 



CARLSON'S 

MEN'S AND BOYS' WEAR 
"Where the Boys Like to Shop" 
Corner of Main and Pleasant 
j NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 

E. S. DICKINSON 


Compliments of 

DOTTIE 

and 
GINGER 


Compliments of 

SHEA & FORTSCH 


TERRY'S 

SPORTSMAN 

CAFE 


E. J. GARE 

Jewelers 
Main Street Northampton 


FIRESTONE 

HOME AND AUTO SUPPLIES 

21 Pleasant St. Phone 2429 

Northampton 
Mass. 


TWIN 

CLEANERS 

and 
Cold Fur Storage 

Phone 1911 
21 INorth St. Northampton 



The E. & J. CIGAR CO. 

WHOLESALE 
TOBACCONISTS 



23 Main Street 



Northampton 



Compliments of 

EDWARD L. SHEEHAN 

24 Pleasant Street 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



Compliments of 

RAYMOND A. LABBEE 

"The Pines" 

Cabins Lunches 

Service Station 

Tel. Northampton 2224-M-3 



Compliments of 

FRANK'S BARBER SHOP 

Prospect St. Hatfield 



Compliments of 

DR, 0. T. DEWHURST 

OPTOMETRIST 

Tel. 184-W 201 Main St. 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



MORIARTY BROTHERS 

Furniture 
NORTHAMPTON 



EAT AND ENJOY 

MANHAN'S 

Potato Chips Cheese Corn 

and 

Norma Lee Candies 

Manhan Potato Chips Co., Inc. 

Tel. 772 92 King St. Northampton 



HATFIELD MARKET 



Meat — Provisions 



Tel. 3911 



M. Klocko, Prop. 



W. E. LONDERGAN 

PRINTING 
Tel. 1740 NORTHAMPTON 100 King St. 


DRESS WELL AND SUCCEED 

Stylish Wearing Apparel for the 

Man or Young Man from 

Head to Foot 

THRIFTILY PRICED 

HARRY DANIEL ASSOCIATES 

Northampton 


AWNINGS 

FURNITURE & UPHOLSTERING 

Harness Shop, Automobile Tops 
Glass and Body Work 

CHJLSON'S SHOPS 

Tel. 1822 
34 Center St. Northampton 


J. W. PARSONS & SON 

Farm Machinery 
Farm Supplies 

Phone 2885 P. 0. Box 152 
75 North King St. 


WEBSTER BOX COMPANY 

West Hatfield, Mass. 
Phone 2311 


FRANK COHN'S SHOE SHOP 

Quality Shoe and Rubber Footwear 
at the Lowiest Prices 

Shoes for All Occasions 

46 Main St. Over Blaine Levin 
Up One Flight and Save Money 


FLYNN'S DRUG STORE 

Prescription Specialists 

JAMES P. FLYNN 
LOUIS P. RUDER 

Registered Pharmacists 
24 Main St. Northampton 



L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 



Attleboro 



Massachusetts 



Class Rings and Pins 

Commencement Announcements 

Diplomas — Personal Cards 

Medals — Trophies 

Club Insignia 

Represented by — GRON LLOYD 

P. 0. Box 144 

Canaan, Connecticut 





Compliments of 


HOWARD JOHNSON'S 


FITZ GERALD'S 


West Hatfield 


BARBER SHOP 




NORTHAMPTON 


Tel. 4681 






C. Papageorge, Prop. 


Compliments of 




THE FAIR STORE 


Compliments of 




UNITED DAIRY, INC. 


27 Pleasant Street 


Northampton 


Northampton 





1896 — 1946 

NORTHAMPTON COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 

"The School of Thoroughness" 

For half a century we have prepared young people for successful 
careers. We pledge a continuance of our thorough training, indi- 
vidual interest, and aid in finding just the right position. 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


RUBY'S FURNITURE STORES 

Lionel L. Foucher, Mgr. 

Telephone 3519 15 Bridge Street 
NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 

DAILY HAMPSHIRE 
GAZETTE 

NORTHAMPTON 


TOCZKO PACKAGE STORE 

Telephone 2031 
HATFIELD 


IMPERIAL BAKERY 

Szyosek Bros. 

Bread and Pastry 

Pleasant St. Northampton 


Compliments of 

BRADSTREET CAFE 

Mr. S. Kacinski, Prop. 

Beer — Wines 
Bradstreet Tel. 2331 



We Extend to the Class of 1946 of Smith Academy 

OUR CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

FOR A SUCCESSFUL FUTURE 

HOWARD & WOODWARD 

INSURANCE 
14 Elm Street Hatfield. Mass. 


MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

Sport Clothes 

Priced right for the young man 
who graduates 

NORTHAMPTON 


NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

John Mateja, Prop. 

Finest Workmanship 

Best Quality of Materials Used 
Our Prices Are Always the Lowest 

Masonic St. Northampton 


CLIFFORD'S 

Candy — Soda 

Hood's Old Fashioned 

Ice Cream 

Next to Calvin Theater 


Locksmith 

KEYS OF ALL KINDS 
LUGGAGE REPAIRING 

HARLOW'S 
24 Center Street Northampton 


RILEY'S 

Dairy and Poultry Feeds Mixed 
Fresh Daily 

Telephone 2103 North Hatfield 


Congratulations and Lots 
of Luck 

TO THE CLASS OF '46 

JACK AUGUST 

NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 

"Eat Fish and Keep Fit"